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Accounts from developers of generic health state utility instruments explain why they produce different QALYs: A qualitative study

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  • Pickles, Kristen
  • Lancsar, Emily
  • Seymour, Janelle
  • Parkin, David
  • Donaldson, Cam
  • Carter, Stacy M.

Abstract

Despite the label “generic” health state utility instruments (HSUIs), empirical evidence shows that different HSUIs generate different estimates of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in the same person. Once a HSUI is used to generate a QALY, the difference between HSUIs is often ignored, and decision-makers act as if ‘a QALY is a QALY is a QALY’. Complementing evidence that different generic HSUIs produce different empirical values, this study addresses an important gap by exploring how HSUIs differ, and processes that produced this difference. 15 developers of six generic HSUIs used for estimating the QOL component of QALYs: Quality of Well-Being (QWB) scale; 15 Dimension instrument (15D); Health Utilities Index (HUI); EuroQol EQ-5D; Short Form-6 Dimension (SF-6D), and the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL) were interviewed in 2012–2013.

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  • Pickles, Kristen & Lancsar, Emily & Seymour, Janelle & Parkin, David & Donaldson, Cam & Carter, Stacy M., 2019. "Accounts from developers of generic health state utility instruments explain why they produce different QALYs: A qualitative study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 240(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:240:y:2019:i:c:s0277953619305544
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.112560
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    2. Joseph Carrello & Alison Hayes & Anagha Killedar & Amy Huben & Louise A. Baur & Stavros Petrou & Thomas Lung, 2021. "Utility Decrements Associated with Adult Overweight and Obesity in Australia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 39(5), pages 503-519, May.

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