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Valuing the EQ-5D and the SF-6D health states using subjective well-being: A secondary analysis of patient data


  • Mukuria, Clara
  • Brazier, John


The economic evaluation of health care technologies employs a standard economic approach based on preferences to provide utility information. Previous studies have used happiness rather than preferences to weight health states using general population data. However, these data may not reflect the full range and scope of health and happiness experienced by patients. This paper applies a similar approach to a large patient sample (N = 15,184) from a hospital in Wales, UK collected between 2002 and 2004. Logit regression models were used to assess the relationship between happiness and the health state classifications of two measures, the EQ-5D and the SF-6D. The results suggest a different weighting across dimensions to that from preference elicitation techniques such as time trade-off and standard gamble. While mental health (depression and anxiety), vitality and social functioning were found to have a large significant association with the patients' own happiness assessment, pain was less so and physical health had no association.

Suggested Citation

  • Mukuria, Clara & Brazier, John, 2013. "Valuing the EQ-5D and the SF-6D health states using subjective well-being: A secondary analysis of patient data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 97-105.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:77:y:2013:i:c:p:97-105 DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.11.012

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. #HEJC for 04/02/2013
      by academichealtheconomists in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2013-01-28 21:07:24


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    Cited by:

    1. Binder, Martin & Coad, Alex, 2013. "“I'm afraid I have bad news for you…” Estimating the impact of different health impairments on subjective well-being," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 155-167.
    2. repec:bla:kyklos:v:70:y:2017:i:1:p:27-41 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dolan, Paul & Kavetsos, Georgios & Tsuchiya, Aki, 2013. "Sick but satisfied: The impact of life and health satisfaction on choice between health scenarios," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 708-714.
    4. Sarah Flèche & Richard Layard, 2017. "Do More of Those in Misery Suffer from Poverty, Unemployment or Mental Illness?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(1), pages 27-41, February.
    5. Karimi, M. & Brazier, J. & Paisley, S., 2017. "How do individuals value health states? A qualitative investigation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 80-88.
    6. Tessier, Philippe & Blanchin, Myriam & Sébille, Véronique, 2017. "Does the relationship between health-related quality of life and subjective well-being change over time? An exploratory study among breast cancer patients," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 96-103.
    7. Hernández-Alava, Mónica & Sampson, Christopher & Wailoo, Allan, 2013. "Happy and healthy: a joint model of health and life satisfaction," MPRA Paper 49766, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Sun Sun & Jiaying Chen & Magnus Johannesson & Paul Kind & Kristina Burström, 2016. "Subjective Well-Being and Its Association with Subjective Health Status, Age, Sex, Region, and Socio-economic Characteristics in a Chinese Population Study," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 833-873, April.
    9. Fabio Zagonari, 2016. "Which Attitudes Will Make us Individually and Socially Happier and Healthier? A Cross-Culture and Cross-Development Analytical Model," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(6), pages 2527-2554, December.
    10. Au, Nicole & Johnston, David W., 2014. "Self-assessed health: What does it mean and what does it hide?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 21-28.


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