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Beyond Engel's law - A cross-country analysis

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  • Kaus, Wolfhard

Abstract

Engel's law is known to be extraordinarily consistent across time and space. To substantiate the distinction between necessities and luxuries, already Ernst Engel (1895) approached a behaviorally founded comprehensive assessment of structural changes in consumer expenditures. To build upon Engel's legacy and to complement the scarce empirical literature, a behavioral approach is applied. It is conjectured that differences in satiation patterns of universally-shared needs translate, on the aggregate level, into different shapes of Engel curves and thus also into different income elasticities of demand. Utilizing nonparametric regression techniques, it is explored whether and which expenditure categories change systematically with rising income. In line with the theoretical expectations, a number of empirical regularities in consumer expenditure patterns can be identified that go well beyond Engel's law.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaus, Wolfhard, 2013. "Beyond Engel's law - A cross-country analysis," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 118-134.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:47:y:2013:i:c:p:118-134
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2013.10.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Miles Parker, 2016. "Global inflation: the role of food, housing and energy prices," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    2. Gasim, Anwar A., 2015. "The embodied energy in trade: What role does specialization play?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 186-197.

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