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Factors affecting soldiers’ time preference: A field study in Israel

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  • Shavit, Tal
  • Lahav, Eyal
  • Benzion, Uri

Abstract

The current field study examines how the day of the week, optimism level and other personal characteristics influences the time preference of soldiers. To do this, we compare the time discount of soldiers in the Israel Defense Forces at the beginning of the work week (Sunday in Israel) and just prior to the weekend (on Thursday afternoon in Israel). The soldiers were asked to answer questionnaires regarding their time preferences, and dispositional optimism. We found that the soldiers have a higher subjective discount rate on Thursday when they need money for weekend activities. In addition, we found that optimism, being a firstborn sibling, having parents with higher earnings, and time remaining until discharge are negatively related to subjective discount rate. Conversely, having a balanced bank account is positively related to subjective discount rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Shavit, Tal & Lahav, Eyal & Benzion, Uri, 2013. "Factors affecting soldiers’ time preference: A field study in Israel," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 75-84.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:44:y:2013:i:c:p:75-84
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2013.02.014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Beraldo, Sergio & Caruso, Raul & Turati, Gilberto, 2013. "Life is now! Time preferences and crime: Aggregate evidence from the Italian regions," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 73-81.
    2. Shavit, Tal & Lahav, Eyal & Shahrabani, Shosh, 2014. "What affects the decision to take an active part in social justice protests? The impacts of confidence in society, time preference and interest in politics," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 52-63.
    3. Weinstock, Eyal & Sonsino, Doron, 2014. "Are risk-seekers more optimistic? Non-parametric approach," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 236-251.
    4. Eyal Lahav & Mosi Rosenboim & Tal Shavit, 2015. "Financial literacy's effect on elicited subjective discount rate," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(2), pages 1360-1368.
    5. Lahav, Eyal & Shavit, Tal & Benzion, Uri, 2016. "Can't wait to celebrate: Holiday euphoria, impulsive behavior and time preference," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 128-134.

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