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Social capital and the distribution of household income in the United States: 1980, 1990, and 2000

  • Robison, Lindon J.
  • Siles, Marcelo E.
  • Jin, Songqing

Social capital is a person or group's sympathy or sense of obligation for another person or group. The objects of sympathetic feelings have social capital. Those holding sympathetic feelings for others provide social capital. Because social capital providers internalize the consequences of their choices on the objects of their social capital, they trade with each other on different terms and at different levels than would occur in arm's length transactions, all other things equal. Furthermore, changes in the distribution of social capital alter the terms and level of trade which in turn alter the distribution of income.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

Volume (Year): 40 (2011)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 538-547

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Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:40:y:2011:i:5:p:538-547
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

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  1. Susan Rose-Ackerman, 1996. "Altruism, Nonprofits, and Economic Theory," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(2), pages 701-728, June.
  2. Robison, Lindon J. & Siles, Marcelo E. & Schmid, A. Allan, 2002. "Social Capital And Poverty Reduction: Toward A Mature Paradigm," Agricultural Economic Report Series 10941, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  3. Cole, Harold L. & Prescott, Edward C., 1997. "Valuation Equilibrium with Clubs," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 19-39, May.
  4. Narayan, Deepa & Pritchett, Lant, 1999. "Cents and Sociability: Household Income and Social Capital in Rural Tanzania," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(4), pages 871-97, July.
  5. Lindon J. Robison & Jan L. Flora, 2003. "The Social Capital Paradigm: Bridging across Disciplines," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1187-1193.
  6. Robison, Lindon J. & Schmid, A. Allan & Siles, Marcelo E., 1999. "Is Social Capital Really Capital?," Staff Papers 11649, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  7. Robison, Lindon J. & Schmid, A. Allan, 1994. "Can Agriculture Prosper Without Increased Social Capital?," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 9(4).
  8. Robinson, Lindon J. & Siles, Marcelo E., 1999. "Social capital and household income distributions in the United States: 1980, 1990," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 43-93.
  9. Mina Baliamoune-Lutz, 2009. "Human Well-Being Effects Of Institutions And Social Capital," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(1), pages 54-66, 01.
  10. Videras Julio R & Owen Ann L, 2006. "Public Goods Provision and Well-Being: Empirical Evidence Consistent with the Warm Glow Theory," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-40, April.
  11. Steve Bond, 2002. "Dynamic panel data models: a guide to microdata methods and practice," CeMMAP working papers CWP09/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  12. Lindon J. Robison & Robert J. Myers & Marcelo E. Siles, 2002. "Social Capital and the Terms of Trade for Farmland," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 24(1), pages 44-58.
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