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Procedural rationality and happiness

  • Castellani, Marco
  • Di Giovinazzo, Viviana
  • Novarese, Marco

The economics of happiness already recognizes how procedures affect the evaluation of outcomes, although this has only been looked at within the standard framework of substantial rationality. This paper aims to go beyond that kind of approach by linking happiness and procedural rationality, focusing on 'happiness for choice' (the individual's perceived satisfaction after the decision-making process). Simon's model shows the need for defining aspirations whose values are adapted to the past experience in a given environment. Some remarks proposed by Scitovsky's allow to extend this idea considering the role of creative representation of the world as a way for trying to go beyond the past. These ideas are tested using data on aspirations and satisfaction expressed by students attending an economic course.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

Volume (Year): 39 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 376-383

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Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:39:y:2010:i:3:p:376-383
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