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Experiment timing and preferences for fairness

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  • Dickinson, David L.

Abstract

Classroom experiments examining fairness preferences [Andreoni, J., Miller, J., 2002. Giving according to GARP: an experimental test of the consistency of preferences for Altruism. Econometrica 70 (2), 737-753] were conducted to examine two issues: first, are classroom points a salient reward medium (comparable to cash in research experiments)? Secondly, does experiment timing during the semester influence results. Subject choices are consistent with the existence of well-behaved utility functions, indicating that points experiments can be valid. Secondly, subjects are more likely to be "selfish" when the experiment is conducted early rather than late in the academic semester. This result has behavioral implications for environments where nonmonetary incentives prevail, as well as implications for the growing number of instructors using experiments and follow-up discussion in the classroom.

Suggested Citation

  • Dickinson, David L., 2009. "Experiment timing and preferences for fairness," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 89-95, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:38:y:2009:i:1:p:89-95
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Heufer, 2013. "Testing revealed preferences for homotheticity with two-good experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 16(1), pages 114-124, March.
    2. Steven Tucker & Shuze Ding & Volodymyr Lugovskyy & Daniela Puzzello & Arlington Williams, 2017. "Cash versus Extra-Credit Incentives in Experimental Asset Markets," Working Papers in Economics 17/21, University of Waikato.
    3. Jan Heufer & Paul van Bruggen, 2016. "Afriat in the Lab," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 16-095/I, Tinbergen Institute.

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    Keywords

    Fairness Experiments Education;

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