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The Impact of Classroom Experiments on the Learning of Economics: An Empirical Investigation

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  • Frank, Bjorn

Abstract

This paper provides limited evidence on the effectiveness of a simple classroom experiment. In different courses in environmental economics or public finance, a brief take-some game was performed. Students who took part in this classroom experiment, as well as those who just watched it, were more successful in answering a multiple-choice test on the 'tragedy of the commons' than control groups from the same courses. Copyright 1997 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank, Bjorn, 1997. "The Impact of Classroom Experiments on the Learning of Economics: An Empirical Investigation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(4), pages 763-769, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:35:y:1997:i:4:p:763-69
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    Cited by:

    1. Beth A. Freeborn & Jason P. Hulbert, 2011. "Persuasive and Informative Advertising: A Classroom Experiment," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 51-59, January.
    2. Humberto Llavador & Marcus Giamattei, 2017. "Teaching microeconomic principles with smartphones – lessons from classroom experiments with classEx," Economics Working Papers 1584, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    3. Tisha Emerson & Denise Hazlett, 2011. "Classroom Experiments," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Zheng, Liping & Severe, Sean, 2016. "Teaching the macroeconomic effects of tax cuts with a quasi-experiment," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 55-65.
    5. Dickinson, David L., 2009. "Experiment timing and preferences for fairness," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 89-95, January.
    6. Yvonne Durham & Thomas Mckinnon & Craig Schulman, 2007. "Classroom Experiments: Not Just Fun And Games," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(1), pages 162-178, January.
    7. Ninos P. Malek & Joshua C. Hall & Collin Hodges, 2014. "A Review and Analysis of the Effectiveness of Alternative Teaching Methods on Student Learning in Economics," Working Papers 14-27, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    8. Giamattei, Marcus & Graf Lambsdorff, Johann, 2015. "classEx: An online software for classroom experiments," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Volkswirtschaftliche Reihe V-68-15, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.

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