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Individual learning in different social contexts

  • Novarese, Marco

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W5H-4J6W75G-1/2/b1e05d1675f0560d710d7040e5288b05
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

Volume (Year): 36 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 15-35

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Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:36:y:2007:i:1:p:15-35
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

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  1. Nicolao Bonini & Massimo Egidi, 1999. "Cognitive traps in individual and organizational behavior: some empirical evidence," CEEL Working Papers 9904, Cognitive and Experimental Economics Laboratory, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
  2. Tilman Slembeck, 2000. "Learning in Economics: Where Do We Stand?," Microeconomics 0004007, EconWPA.
  3. Rabin, Matthew, 1993. "Incorporating Fairness into Game Theory and Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1281-1302, December.
  4. Cohen, Michael D, et al, 1996. "Routines and Other Recurring Action Patterns of Organizations: Contemporary Research Issues," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 653-98.
  5. Alessandro Narduzzo & Massimo Egidi, 1996. "The emergence of path-dependent behaviors in cooperative contexts," CEEL Working Papers 9604, Cognitive and Experimental Economics Laboratory, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
  6. Marco Novarese & Salvatore Rizzello, 2003. "Satisfaction and Learning: an experimental game to measure happiness," Microeconomics 0306004, EconWPA.
  7. Erev, Ido & Roth, Alvin E, 1998. "Predicting How People Play Games: Reinforcement Learning in Experimental Games with Unique, Mixed Strategy Equilibria," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(4), pages 848-81, September.
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