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Public transport in towns - Inevitably on the decline?

Author

Listed:
  • Holmgren, Johan
  • Jansson, Jan Owen
  • Ljungberg, Anders

Abstract

Bus transport in Linkping, a town of 140[punctuation space]000 people, was strongly on the increase up to the beginning of the 1980s, when a negative trend-break occurred. A demand model is developed which explains both the ongoing decline and the preceding increase. Based on this model, it is examined whether a change of the current bus transport policy towards an optimal pricing and investment policy from a social point of view could evoke a new and positive trend-break. Taking current trends in the exogenous factors into account it would. However, this could depend on a possible revival of bicycling in towns.

Suggested Citation

  • Holmgren, Johan & Jansson, Jan Owen & Ljungberg, Anders, 2008. "Public transport in towns - Inevitably on the decline?," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 65-74, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:retrec:v:23:y:2008:i:1:p:65-74
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mohring, Herbert, 1972. "Optimization and Scale Economies in Urban Bus Transportation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 591-604, September.
    2. Holmgren, Johan, 2007. "Meta-analysis of public transport demand," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(10), pages 1021-1035, December.
    3. Anthony J. Venables, 2007. "Evaluating Urban Transport Improvements: Cost-Benefit Analysis in the Presence of Agglomeration and Income Taxation," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 41(2), pages 173-188, May.
    4. Charles L. Ballard & Don Fullerton, 1992. "Distortionary Taxes and the Provision of Public Goods," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 117-131, Summer.
    5. Sergio Jara-Díaz & Antonio Gschwender, 2003. "Towards a general microeconomic model for the operation of public transport," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 453-469, July.
    6. Curtis, Carey, 2008. "Planning for sustainable accessibility: The implementation challenge," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 104-112, March.
    7. Banister, David, 2008. "The sustainable mobility paradigm," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 73-80, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. José Castillo-Manzano & Antonio Sánchez-Braza, 2013. "Managing a smart bicycle system when demand outstrips supply: the case of the university community in Seville," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 459-477, February.
    2. Holmgren, Johan, 2010. "Putting our money to good use: Can we attract more passengers without increasing subsidies?," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 256-260.
    3. Ljungberg, Anders, 2010. "Local public transport on the basis of social economic criteria," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 339-345.

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