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Public transport in towns - Inevitably on the decline?

  • Holmgren, Johan
  • Jansson, Jan Owen
  • Ljungberg, Anders
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    Bus transport in Linkping, a town of 140[punctuation space]000 people, was strongly on the increase up to the beginning of the 1980s, when a negative trend-break occurred. A demand model is developed which explains both the ongoing decline and the preceding increase. Based on this model, it is examined whether a change of the current bus transport policy towards an optimal pricing and investment policy from a social point of view could evoke a new and positive trend-break. Taking current trends in the exogenous factors into account it would. However, this could depend on a possible revival of bicycling in towns.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B8JHM-4V57Y0R-1/2/eead6ca9debb45935c14966240014c0f
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research in Transportation Economics.

    Volume (Year): 23 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 65-74

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:retrec:v:23:y:2008:i:1:p:65-74
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    1. Mohring, Herbert, 1972. "Optimization and Scale Economies in Urban Bus Transportation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 591-604, September.
    2. Anthony J. Venables, 2004. "Evaluating Urban Transport Improvements: Cost Benefit Analysis in the Presence of Agglomeration and Income Taxation," CEP Discussion Papers dp0651, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Curtis, Carey, 2008. "Planning for sustainable accessibility: The implementation challenge," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 104-112, March.
    4. Charles L. Ballard & Don Fullerton, 1992. "Distortionary Taxes and the Provision of Public Goods," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 117-131, Summer.
    5. Holmgren, Johan, 2007. "Meta-analysis of public transport demand," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(10), pages 1021-1035, December.
    6. Banister, David, 2008. "The sustainable mobility paradigm," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 73-80, March.
    7. Sergio Jara-Díaz & Antonio Gschwender, 2003. "Towards a general microeconomic model for the operation of public transport," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 453-469, July.
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