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When does community participation enhance the performance of open source software companies?


  • Stam, Wouter


This study examined how participation in open innovation communities influences the innovative and financial performance of firms commercializing open source software. Using an original dataset of open source companies in the Netherlands, I found that the community participation-performance relationship is curvilinear. In addition, results indicate that extensive technical participation in open source projects is more strongly related to performance for firms that also engage in social ("offline") community activities, for companies of larger size, and for firms with high R&D intensities. Overall, this research refines our understanding of the boundary conditions under which engagement in community-based innovation yields private returns to commercial actors.

Suggested Citation

  • Stam, Wouter, 2009. "When does community participation enhance the performance of open source software companies?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 1288-1299, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:38:y:2009:i:8:p:1288-1299

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Colombo, Massimo G. & Piva, Evila & Rossi-Lamastra, Cristina, 2014. "Open innovation and within-industry diversification in small and medium enterprises: The case of open source software firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(5), pages 891-902.
    2. Saim Kashmiri & Vijay Mahajan, 2014. "A Rose by Any Other Name: Are Family Firms Named After Their Founding Families Rewarded More for Their New Product Introductions?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 124(1), pages 81-99, September.
    3. repec:spr:scient:v:104:y:2015:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-015-1628-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Dahlander, Linus & Piezunka, Henning, 2014. "Open to suggestions: How organizations elicit suggestions through proactive and reactive attention," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(5), pages 812-827.
    5. Rolandsson, Bertil & Bergquist, Magnus & Ljungberg, Jan, 2011. "Open source in the firm: Opening up professional practices of software development," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 576-587, May.
    6. Ger Post & Lotte Geertsen, 2016. "Collective ideation within the context of science and technology park and regional triple helix network," ERSA conference papers ersa16p846, European Regional Science Association.
    7. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:5:p:970-983 is not listed on IDEAS


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