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Carbon tax and revenue recycling: Impacts on households in British Columbia

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  • Beck, Marisa
  • Rivers, Nicholas
  • Wigle, Randall
  • Yonezawa, Hidemichi

Abstract

This study investigates the distributional implications of the revenue-neutral carbon tax policy in British Columbia. We use a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the Canadian economy and disaggregate households into deciles by annual income using data from a large household expenditure survey. Using the model, we find that the existing BC carbon tax is highly progressive even prior to consideration of the revenue recycling scheme, such that the negative impact of the carbon tax on households with below-median income is smaller than that on households with above-median income. We show that our finding is a result of welfare effects of a carbon tax being determined primarily by the source of a households’ income rather than by the destination of its expenditures. Finally, we show that the existing revenue recycling scheme is also progressive. Overall, the tax appears to be highly progressive.

Suggested Citation

  • Beck, Marisa & Rivers, Nicholas & Wigle, Randall & Yonezawa, Hidemichi, 2015. "Carbon tax and revenue recycling: Impacts on households in British Columbia," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 40-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:41:y:2015:i:c:p:40-69
    DOI: 10.1016/j.reseneeco.2015.04.005
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    Cited by:

    1. Fang, Guochang & Tian, Lixin & Fu, Min & Sun, Mei & Du, Ruijin & Liu, Menghe, 2017. "Investigating carbon tax pilot in YRD urban agglomerations—Analysis of a novel ESER system with carbon tax constraints and its application," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 194(C), pages 635-647.
    2. repec:clg:wpaper:2015-15 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Farrell, Niall, 2017. "What Factors Drive Inequalities in Carbon Tax Incidence? Decomposing Socioeconomic Inequalities in Carbon Tax Incidence in Ireland," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 31-45.
    4. Z. Eylem Gevrek & Ayse Uyduranoglu, 2015. "Public Preferences for Carbon Tax Attributes," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2015-15, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    5. Andreas Welling, 2017. "Optimal Carbon Tax Scheme under Uncertainty in an Oligopolistic Market of Polluters," FEMM Working Papers 170001, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    6. Klenert, David & Mattauch, Linus & Combet, Emmanuel & Edenhofer, Ottmar & Hepburn, Cameron & Rafaty, Ryan & Stern, Nicholas, 2017. "Making Carbon Pricing Work," MPRA Paper 80943, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Murray, Brian & Rivers, Nicholas, 2015. "British Columbia’s revenue-neutral carbon tax: A review of the latest “grand experiment” in environmental policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 674-683.
    8. Jared C. Carbone & Kenneth J. McKenzie, 2015. "Going Dutch? The Impact of Oil Price Shocks on the Canadian Economy," Working Papers 2015-07, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    9. Mathias Kirchner & Mark Sommer & Claudia Kettner-Marx & Daniela Kletzan-Slamanig & Katharina Köberl & Kurt Kratena, 2018. "CO2 Tax Scenarios for Austria. Impacts on Household Income Groups, CO2 Emissions, and the Economy," WIFO Working Papers 558, WIFO.
    10. Pereira, Alfredo & Pereira, Rui, 2017. "The Role of Electricity for the Decarbonization of the Portuguese Economy - DGEP Technical Report," MPRA Paper 84782, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Wang, Qian & Hubacek, Klaus & Feng, Kuishuang & Wei, Yi-Ming & Liang, Qiao-Mei, 2016. "Distributional effects of carbon taxation," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 1123-1131.
    12. Gevrek, Z.Eylem & Uyduranoglu, Ayse, 2015. "Public preferences for carbon tax attributes," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 186-197.
    13. Beck, Marisa & Rivers, Nicholas & Yonezawa, Hidemichi, 2016. "A rural myth? Sources and implications of the perceived unfairness of carbon taxes in rural communities," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 124-134.
    14. Stephane Hallegatte & Mook Bangalore & Laura Bonzanigo & Marianne Fay & Tamaro Kane & Ulf Narloch & Julie Rozenberg & David Treguer & Adrien Vogt-Schilb, 2016. "Shock Waves," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 22787, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Carbon taxes; Distributional effects; British Columbia; Computable general equilibrium analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General

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