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Recycling under a material balance constraint

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  • Pittel, Karen
  • Amigues, Jean-Pierre
  • Kuhn, Thomas

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the dynamic implications of recycling for resource use, the level of economic activity and the long-run development of the economy. In contrast to former approaches, we take explicit account of the circulation of matter in the economy. We consider virgin resources and recycled wastes as essential inputs to production. These material inputs either end up as waste after consumption or are bound in the capital stock--depending on the utilization of the produced output. As accumulating wastes can be recycled and again be employed in production, the waste stock serves as a source of valuable inputs in our model. We focus on the implications of recycling-related market failures and the integration of material balances on the dynamics of the economy. It is shown that a market for waste and subsidies to resource extractors and recycling firms can restore optimality in the decentralized economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Pittel, Karen & Amigues, Jean-Pierre & Kuhn, Thomas, 2010. "Recycling under a material balance constraint," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 379-394, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:32:y:2010:i:3:p:379-394
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Grimaud, Andre & Rouge, Luc, 2003. "Non-renewable resources and growth with vertical innovations: optimum, equilibrium and economic policies," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(2, Supple), pages 433-453, March.
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    6. Christian Groth & Poul Schou, 2002. "Can non-renewable resources alleviate the knife-edge character of endogenous growth?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(3), pages 386-411, July.
    7. Michel, Philippe, 1982. "On the Transversality Condition in Infinite Horizon Optimal Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 975-985, July.
    8. Karen Pittel, 2006. "A Kuznets Curve for Recycling," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 06/52, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    9. Thomas Kuhn & Karen Pittel & Thomas Schulz, 2003. "Recycling for sustainability - a long run perspective?," International Journal of Global Environmental Issues, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 3(3), pages 339-355.
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    Cited by:

    1. Voosholz, Frauke, 2014. "The influence of different production functions on modeling resource extraction and economic growth," CAWM Discussion Papers 72, University of Münster, Center of Applied Economic Research Münster (CAWM).
    2. Rosendahl, Knut Einar & Rubiano, Diana Roa, 2018. "How effective is lithium recycling as a remedy for resource scarcity?," Working Paper Series 3-2018, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, School of Economics and Business, revised 16 Apr 2018.
    3. Levin, Mark, 2018. "Research of Economic Models of Innovations Aimed at Overcoming the Deficit of Natural Resources," Working Papers 021803, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
    4. Kiyoka Akimoto & Koichi Futagami, 2018. "Transition from a Linear Economy toward a Circular Economy in the Ramsey Model," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 18-09, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    5. Peter Birch Sørensen, 2017. "The Basic Environmental Economics of The Circular Economy," EPRU Working Paper Series 17-04, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.

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