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Financing renewable energy infrastructures via financial citizen participation – The case of Germany

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  • Yildiz, Özgür

Abstract

Financing decentralized renewable energy infrastructures in Germany is a complex issue due to the fact that public authorities lack the needed capital and institutional private investors are generally averse to restraints such as high transaction costs and risk-return-concerns. Consequently, alternative financing concepts must be developed to keep the energy transition going. An approach that has recently gained attention in Germany is the concept of financial citizen participation. The concept entails that private individuals contribute to the realization of infrastructure projects by investing in renewable energy projects via various business models and financing concepts.

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  • Yildiz, Özgür, 2014. "Financing renewable energy infrastructures via financial citizen participation – The case of Germany," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 677-685.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:renene:v:68:y:2014:i:c:p:677-685
    DOI: 10.1016/j.renene.2014.02.038
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    References listed on IDEAS

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