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Public participation in wind energy projects located in Germany: Which form of participation is the key to acceptance?

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  • Langer, Katharina
  • Decker, Thomas
  • Menrad, Klaus

Abstract

It is widely recognized that social aspects play an important role in the implementation of wind energy projects. The energy transition in Germany can only succeed if the needs and expectations of local citizens are taken into account. Previous research has shown that public participation fosters the acceptance of wind energy by citizens. This study explores which form of participation citizens prefer with respect to wind energy projects. Opportunities for participation range from no participation, alibi participation, information, consultation, cooperation and financial participation. We used a hypothetical choice experiment in which people are asked to choose between different wind energy projects that were described by a number of attributes. The results show that the most important factors influencing the acceptance of wind energy projects are the sound level at the place of residence, the distance of the turbines to the place of residence and participation opportunities. With regard to participation, respondents prefer information over financial participation. The results suggest that citizens should be involved in informative and deliberative participation processes.

Suggested Citation

  • Langer, Katharina & Decker, Thomas & Menrad, Klaus, 2017. "Public participation in wind energy projects located in Germany: Which form of participation is the key to acceptance?," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 63-73.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:renene:v:112:y:2017:i:c:p:63-73
    DOI: 10.1016/j.renene.2017.05.021
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Lam, J. & Li, V. & Reiner, D. & Han, Y., 2018. "Trust in Government and Effective Nuclear Safety Governance in Great Britain," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1827, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:11:p:2108-:d:119535 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:enepol:v:124:y:2019:i:c:p:346-354 is not listed on IDEAS
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