IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Optimization of floor area ratio regulation in a growing city

  • Joshi, Kirti Kusum
  • Kono, Tatsuhito

Maximum floor area ratio (FAR) regulation is widely imposed in cities to mitigate negative population externalities (e.g. congestion). This paper presents determination of optimal FAR regulation in a two-zone city with a growing population. Results show the following. 1) Maximum FAR regulation alone is generally insufficient. It should be accompanied by minimum FAR regulation in one zone. 2) Optimal regulation at a particular time depends on expected changes in zonal populations over the longest replacement time among newly built buildings at that time. 3) Zonal optimal FAR is expected to vary with time, which might even necessitate replacement of maximum FAR with minimum FAR, and vice versa.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V89-4VNH3MV-1/2/f70ed6f0e36f2129e26c5c6da276194b
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Regional Science and Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 39 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 502-511

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:39:y:2009:i:4:p:502-511
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/regec

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Jan K. Brueckner, 1990. "Growth Controls and Land Values in an Open City," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 66(3), pages 237-248.
  2. Wheaton, William C., 1998. "Land Use and Density in Cities with Congestion," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 258-272, March.
  3. Bertaud, Alain & Brueckner, Jan K., 2005. "Analyzing building-height restrictions: predicted impacts and welfare costs," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 109-125, March.
  4. Lin, C.-C.Chu-Chia & Mai, Chao-Cheng & Wang, Ping, 2004. "Urban land policy and housing in an endogenously growing monocentric city," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 241-261, May.
  5. Richard Arnott & James G. MacKinnon, 1976. "Measuring the Costs of Height Restrictions with a General Equilibrium Model," Working Papers 242, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  6. Sakashita, Noboru, 1995. "An economic theory of urban growth control," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 427-434, August.
  7. T Akita & M Fujita, 1982. "Spatial development processes with renewal in a growing city," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 14(2), pages 205-223, February.
  8. Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2004. "Optimal Urban Land Use and Zoning," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 7(1), pages 69-106, January.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:39:y:2009:i:4:p:502-511. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.