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How do stock prices respond to fundamental shocks in the case of the United States? Evidence from NASDAQ and DJIA

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  • Jean Louis, Rosmy
  • Eldomiaty, Tarek

Abstract

In this paper, we use both the Dow Jones and NASDAQ indices to test the robustness of Binswanger's (2004c) finding that US stock market dynamics are governed mostly by nonfundamental shocks or speculative bubbles after the 1982 debt crisis. We estimate a total of 72 SVAR models and 36 SVECM models. We determine that the findings are robust indeed and that fundamental shocks have become less and less important over the years, irrespective of which US stock market index is considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean Louis, Rosmy & Eldomiaty, Tarek, 2010. "How do stock prices respond to fundamental shocks in the case of the United States? Evidence from NASDAQ and DJIA," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 310-322, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:50:y:2010:i:3:p:310-322
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Velinov, Anton, 2016. "On the importance of testing structural identification schemes and the potential consequences of incorrectly identified models," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145581, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Andrei Salem Gonçalves & Robert Aldo Iquiapaza & Aureliano Angel Bressan, 2012. "Latent Fundamentals Arbitrage with a Mixed Effects Factor Model," Brazilian Review of Finance, Brazilian Society of Finance, vol. 10(3), pages 317-335.
    3. Morris, John J. & Alam, Pervaiz, 2012. "Value relevance and the dot-com bubble of the 1990s," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 243-255.
    4. Velinov, Anton & Chen, Wenjuan, 2015. "Do stock prices reflect their fundamentals? New evidence in the aftermath of the financial crisis," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 1-20.
    5. Numan Ülkü & Duminda Kuruppuarachchi, 2015. "Stock Market's Response to Real Output Shocks: Connection Restored but Delayed," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 613-622, December.

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