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Changes in Malaysia: Capital controls, prime ministers and political connections

Author

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  • Mitchell, Heather
  • Joseph, Saramma

Abstract

During the 1997 Asian currency crisis and resulting imposition of capital controls in Malaysia, evidence from previous studies shows that firms with political connections suffered more during the crisis but benefited more when capital controls were introduced. In the period since then, the evidence shows financial firms with political connections have not performed as well as others since the measures set up to support them have been removed. The study period not only includes the relaxation of capital controls, but also the resignation of Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohammad as prime minister and the handover of control to Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi.

Suggested Citation

  • Mitchell, Heather & Joseph, Saramma, 2010. "Changes in Malaysia: Capital controls, prime ministers and political connections," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 460-476, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pacfin:v:18:y:2010:i:5:p:460-476
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ethan Kaplan & Dani Rodrik, 2002. "Did the Malaysian Capital Controls Work?," NBER Chapters,in: Preventing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 393-440 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Choudhry, Taufiq, 2005. "Time-varying beta and the Asian financial crisis: Evidence from Malaysian and Taiwanese firms," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 93-118, January.
    3. Raghuram G. Rajan & Luigi Zingales, 1998. "Which Capitalism? Lessons Form The East Asian Crisis," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 11(3), pages 40-48.
    4. Randall Morck & David Stangeland & Bernard Yeung, 2000. "Inherited Wealth, Corporate Control, and Economic Growth The Canadian Disease?," NBER Chapters,in: Concentrated Corporate Ownership, pages 319-372 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Chong, Beng-Soon & Liu, Ming-Hua & Tan, Kok-Hui, 2006. "The wealth effect of forced bank mergers and cronyism," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 3215-3233, November.
    6. Johnson, Simon & Mitton, Todd, 2003. "Cronyism and capital controls: evidence from Malaysia," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 351-382, February.
    7. MARA FACCIO & RONALD W. MASULIS & JOHN J. McCONNELL, 2006. "Political Connections and Corporate Bailouts," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(6), pages 2597-2635, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pham, Nga & Oh, K.B. & Pech, Richard, 2015. "Mergers and acquisitions: CEO duality, operating performance and stock returns in Vietnam," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 35(PA), pages 298-316.
    2. Christopher Andrew Hartwell, 2014. "Capital Controls and the Determinants of Entrepreneurship," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 64(6), pages 434-456, December.
    3. Jasman Tuyon & Zamri Ahmada, 2016. "Behavioural finance perspectives on Malaysian stock market efficiency," Borsa Istanbul Review, Research and Business Development Department, Borsa Istanbul, vol. 16(1), pages 43-61, March.
    4. Hartwell, Christopher A., 2011. "All That’s Old is New Again: Capital Controls and the Macroeconomic Determinants of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Markets," MPRA Paper 40257, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. repec:eee:jimfin:v:77:y:2017:i:c:p:180-198 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Razak, Lutfi Abdul & Masih, Mansur, 2017. "Revisit Feldstein-Horioka puzzle: evidence from Malaysia (1960-2015)," MPRA Paper 79407, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Ebrahim, M. Shahid & Girma, Sourafel & Shah, M. Eskandar & Williams, Jonathan, 2014. "Dynamic capital structure and political patronage: The case of Malaysia," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 117-128.
    8. Amiruddin BIN MUHAMED & Rebecca STRÄTLING & Aly SALAMA, 2014. "The Impact Of Government Investment Organizations In Malaysia On The Performance Of Their Portfolio Companies," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 85(3), pages 453-473, September.

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