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Productivity differences and the dynamic effects of labor movements

  • Klein, Paul
  • Ventura, Gustavo

Barriers to labor mobility across countries coexist with substantial differences in living standards largely attributable to productivity differences. A growth model with endogenous labor movements is used to assess the effects on output, capital accumulation and welfare of removing barriers to labor mobility. The model is parameterized so that it is consistent with evidence on historical labor movements, and is applied to two cases: the enlargement of the European Union and the (hypothetical) creation of a common labor market in the North America. The main finding is that there are large resulting gains in terms of output and welfare.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Monetary Economics.

Volume (Year): 56 (2009)
Issue (Month): 8 (November)
Pages: 1059-1073

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Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:56:y:2009:i:8:p:1059-1073
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505566

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