IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/matcom/v108y2015icp41-62.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Credit market imperfection, financial market globalization, and catastrophic transition

Author

Listed:
  • Agliari, Anna
  • Rillosi, Francesco
  • Vachadze, George

Abstract

We analyze a two-country overlapping generations model with integrated financial markets. We assume heterogeneous countries with respect to the population size, to the technology and to the level of credit market imperfection. We show that a subcritical Neimark–Sacker bifurcation may occur and that, before its destabilization, a stable steady state coexists with two invariant closed curves – one attracting and one repelling. In this way we reinforce existing results on the implications of the credit market imperfection that not only causes amplification and persistence of macroeconomic shocks, but also leads to significant changes in the long run behavior of the economy (i.e., catastrophic transition).

Suggested Citation

  • Agliari, Anna & Rillosi, Francesco & Vachadze, George, 2015. "Credit market imperfection, financial market globalization, and catastrophic transition," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 41-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:matcom:v:108:y:2015:i:c:p:41-62
    DOI: 10.1016/j.matcom.2014.05.009
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378475414001499
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Foroni, Ilaria & Agliari, Anna, 2011. "Complex dynamics associated with the appearance/disappearance of invariant closed curves," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 81(8), pages 1640-1655.
    2. Mark Gertler & Simon Gilchrist, 1994. "Monetary Policy, Business Cycles, and the Behavior of Small Manufacturing Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 309-340.
    3. Anna Agliari & George Vachadze, 2011. "Homoclinic and Heteroclinic Bifurcations in an Overlapping Generations Model with Credit Market Imperfection," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 38(3), pages 241-260, October.
    4. Matsuyama, Kiminori, 2013. "The good, the bad, and the ugly: An inquiry into the causes and nature of credit cycles," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 8(3), September.
    5. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Moore, John, 1997. "Credit Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 211-248, April.
    6. Azariadis, Costas & Smith, Bruce, 1998. "Financial Intermediation and Regime Switching in Business Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 516-536, June.
    7. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2000. "Endogenous Inequality," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(4), pages 743-759.
    8. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2004. "Financial Market Globalization, Symmetry-Breaking, and Endogenous Inequality of Nations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(3), pages 853-884, May.
    9. Woodford, Michael, 1986. "Stationary sunspot equilibria in a finance constrained economy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 128-137, October.
    10. Kind, Christoph, 1999. "Remarks on the economic interpretation of Hopf bifurcations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 147-154, February.
    11. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2007. "Credit Traps and Credit Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 503-516, March.
    12. Kikuchi, Tomoo & Stachurski, John, 2009. "Endogenous inequality and fluctuations in a two-country model," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 144(4), pages 1560-1571, July.
    13. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1989. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 14-31, March.
    14. Azariadis, Costas & Smith, Bruce D, 1996. "Private Information, Money, and Growth: Indeterminacy, Fluctuations, and the Mundell-Tobin Effect," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 309-332, September.
    15. Agliari, Anna & Gardini, Laura & Puu, Tönu, 2005. "Some global bifurcations related to the appearance of closed invariant curves," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 201-219.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Catastrophic transition; Crater bifurcation; Credit market imperfection; Financial globalization;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:matcom:v:108:y:2015:i:c:p:41-62. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/mathematics-and-computers-in-simulation/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.