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The effect of talent disparity on team productivity in soccer

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  • Franck, Egon
  • Nüesch, Stephan

Abstract

Theory predicts that the interaction type within a team moderates the impact of talent disparity on team productivity. Using panel data from professional German soccer teams, we test talent composition effects at different team levels characterized by different interaction types. At the match level, complementarities are expected due to the continuous interaction of the fielded players. If the entire squad is analyzed at the seasonal level, substitutability emerges from the fact that only a (varying) selection of players can prove their talent in the competition games. Holding average ability and unobserved team heterogeneity constant, we find that the players selected to play on the competition team should be rather homogeneous regarding their talent. However, if we relate talent differences within the entire squad to the team's league standing at the end of the season, talent disparity turns out to be beneficial.

Suggested Citation

  • Franck, Egon & Nüesch, Stephan, 2010. "The effect of talent disparity on team productivity in soccer," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 218-229, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:31:y:2010:i:2:p:218-229
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    Cited by:

    1. Zheng, Sijing & Zeng, Xiaohua & Zhang, Cheng, 2016. "The effects of role variety and ability disparity on virtual group performance," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 3468-3477.
    2. Hoogendoorn, Sander M. & Parker, Simon C. & van Praag, Mirjam C., 2012. "Ability Dispersion and Team Performance: A Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 7044, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. repec:eee:intfor:v:34:y:2018:i:1:p:17-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Julia Müller & Thorsten Upmann, 2017. "Eigenvalue Productivity: Measurement of Individual Contributions in Teams," CESifo Working Paper Series 6679, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:4:p:1759-1770 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Bäker, Agnes & Mertins, Vanessa, 2013. "Risk-sorting and preference for team piece rates," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 285-300.
    7. Marc Gürtler & Oliver Gürtler, 2015. "The Optimality of Heterogeneous Tournaments," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(4), pages 1007-1042.
    8. Faisal Al-Madi & Khalaf Ibrahim Al-Tarawneh & Marwan Ahmad Alshammari, 2016. "HR Practices in the Soccer Industry: Promising Research Arena," International Review of Management and Marketing, Econjournals, vol. 6(4), pages 641-653.
    9. Julia Müller & Thorsten Upmann & Joachim Prinz, 2013. "Individual Team Productivity - A Conceptual Approach," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-183/I, Tinbergen Institute.
    10. Besters, Lucas, 2018. "Economics of professional football," Other publications TiSEM d9e6b9b7-a17b-4665-9cca-1, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    11. Bernd Frick & Rob Simmons, 2014. "The footballers’ labour market after the Bosman ruling," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Professional Football, chapter 13, pages 203-226 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Eugster Manuel J. A. & Gertheiss Jan & Kaiser Sebastian, 2011. "Having the Second Leg at Home - Advantage in the UEFA Champions League Knockout Phase?," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-11, January.
    13. repec:spr:epolit:v:34:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s40888-017-0062-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Egon Franck & Stephan Nüesch & Jan Pieper, 2011. "Specific Human Capital as a Source of Superior Team Performance," Schmalenbach Business Review (sbr), LMU Munich School of Management, vol. 63(4), pages 376-392, October.
    15. Raul Caruso & Marco Di Domizio & Domenico Rossignoli, 2017. "Aggregate wages of players and performance in Italian Serie A," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 34(3), pages 515-531, December.
    16. Sander Hoogendoorn & Simon C. Parker & Mirjam van Praag, 2014. "Ability Dispersion and Team Performance," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-053/VII, Tinbergen Institute.
    17. Nüesch Stephan & Haas Hartmut, 2012. "Empirical Evidence on the “Never Change a Winning Team” Heuristic," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 232(3), pages 247-257, June.
    18. Gerd Muehlheusser & Sandra Schneemann & Dirk Sliwka, 2016. "The Impact Of Managerial Change On Performance: The Role Of Team Heterogeneity," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 1128-1149, April.
    19. Caruso, Raul & Carlo, Bellavite Pellegrini & Marco, Di Domizio, 2016. "Does diversity in the payroll affect soccer teams’ performance? Evidence from the Italian Serie A," MPRA Paper 75644, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Rosendahl Huber, Laura & Sloof, Randolph & van Praag, Mirjam C., 2014. "Jacks-of-All-Trades? The Effect of Balanced Skills on Team Performance," IZA Discussion Papers 8237, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    21. Hartmut Haas & Stephan Nuesch, 2013. "Are multinational teams more successful?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0088, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    22. Bernd Frick & Young Lee, 2011. "Temporal variations in technical efficiency: evidence from German soccer," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 15-24, February.

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