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Micro-foundation for a constant elasticity of substitution production function through mechanization

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  • Nakamura, Hideki

Abstract

We consider an increase in the range of capital use as a form of mechanization. A constant elasticity of substitution (CES) production function is dynamically derived from Leontief production functions through the endogenous complementary relationship between capital accumulation and mechanization. This implies that a CES production function can be resolved into technological change that does not involve changes in total factor productivity. Furthermore, using the normalizing procedure of the CES production function developed by de La Grandville [de La Grandville, O., 1989. In quest of the Slutsky diamond. American Economic Review 79, 468-481], we investigate how mechanization is related to the elasticity of substitution in our endogenous growth model.

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  • Nakamura, Hideki, 2009. "Micro-foundation for a constant elasticity of substitution production function through mechanization," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 464-472, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:31:y:2009:i:3:p:464-472
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    Cited by:

    1. Growiec, Jakub, 2018. "Factor-specific technology choice," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 1-14.
    2. Growiec, Jakub, 2013. "Factor-augmenting technology choice and monopolistic competition," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 38(PA), pages 86-94.
    3. Michael Knoblach & Fabian Stöckl, 2020. "What Determines The Elasticity Of Substitution Between Capital And Labor? A Literature Review," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(4), pages 847-875, September.
    4. Growiec, Jakub, 2013. "A microfoundation for normalized CES production functions with factor-augmenting technical change," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 2336-2350.
    5. Hideki Nakamura, 2010. "Factor Substitution, Mechanization, And Economic Growth," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 61(2), pages 266-281, June.
    6. Vladimir Matveenko, 2013. "Resources, Institutions And Technologies: Game Modeling Of Dual Relations," Montenegrin Journal of Economics, Economic Laboratory for Transition Research (ELIT), vol. 9(3), pages 7-28.
    7. Nakamura, Hideki & Zeira, Joseph, 2018. "Automation and Unemployment: Help is on the Way," CEPR Discussion Papers 12974, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Ryosuke Shimizu & Shohei Momoda, 2020. "Does Automation Technology increase Wage?," KIER Working Papers 1039, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    9. Kemnitz, Alexander & Knoblach, Michael, 2020. "Endogenous sigma-augmenting technological change: An R&D-based approach," CEPIE Working Papers 02/20, Technische Universität Dresden, Center of Public and International Economics (CEPIE).
    10. Temple, Jonathan, 2012. "The calibration of CES production functions," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 294-303.

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