IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jhouse/v17y2008i1p88-101.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

House price depreciation rates and level of maintenance

Author

Listed:
  • Wilhelmsson, Mats

Abstract

My objective in this paper is to estimate different depreciation rates of house prices depending on the level of maintenance of the property and the location of the property. I do this by supplementing transaction price data with owner information about level of maintenance. The result indicates that the level of maintenance has a substantial impact on the price level. Since maintenance offsets some of the physical deterioration of the property, the depreciation rate will be lowered by maintenance, ceteris paribus. To be able to estimate maintenance effects on depreciation rates, I isolated the interaction effect between the level of maintenance and the age of the property to allow for the fact that maintenance has an impact on the effective age of the property. In this study, I separate maintenance into indoor and outdoor maintenance levels (or absence of maintenance). My results show that the depreciation rates are significantly different for a maintained property and for a property that is not maintained. The price difference between a 40-year-old property (built in 1960) and maintained both indoors and outdoors and a property of the same age that is not maintained is about 13% (-10% compared to -23% in total age effect). The absence of outdoor maintenance has more impact on price depreciation rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Wilhelmsson, Mats, 2008. "House price depreciation rates and level of maintenance," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 88-101, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:17:y:2008:i:1:p:88-101
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1051-1377(07)00043-5
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chinloy, Peter, 1980. "The effect of maintenance expenditures on the measurement of depreciation in housing," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 86-107, July.
    2. Mats Wilhelmsson, 2000. "The Impact of Traffic Noise on the Values of Single-family Houses," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 799-815.
    3. Stephen Malpezzi & Larry Ozanne & Thomas G. Thibodeau, 1987. "Microeconomic Estimates of Housing Depreciation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 63(4), pages 372-385.
    4. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    5. Brent C Smith, 2004. "Economic Depreciation of Residential Real Estate: Microlevel Space and Time Analysis," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 32(1), pages 161-180, March.
    6. Halvorsen, Robert & Palmquist, Raymond, 1980. "The Interpretation of Dummy Variables in Semilogarithmic Equations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 474-475, June.
    7. Knight, John R. & Sirmans, C. F., 1996. "Depreciation, Maintenance, and Housing Prices," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 369-389, December.
    8. Silver, Mick, 2000. "Hedonic regressions: an application to VCRs using scanner data," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 399-408, August.
    9. John R. Knight & Thomas Miceli & C. F. Sirmans, 2000. "Repair Expenses, Selling Contracts, and House Prices," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 20(3), pages 323-336.
    10. Clapp, John M. & Giaccotto, Carmelo, 1998. "Residential Hedonic Models: A Rational Expectations Approach to Age Effects," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 415-437, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hull, Isaiah, 2017. "Amortization requirements and household indebtedness: An application to Swedish-style mortgages," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 72-88.
    2. Suntum, Ulrich van, 2009. "Housing, taxation and retirement provision," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 249-255, September.
    3. Dastrup, Samuel R. & Graff Zivin, Joshua & Costa, Dora L. & Kahn, Matthew E., 2012. "Understanding the Solar Home price premium: Electricity generation and “Green” social status," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(5), pages 961-973.
    4. Jiro Yoshida & Ayako Sugiura, 2015. "The Effects of Multiple Green Factors on Condominium Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 412-437, April.
    5. Stuart S. Rosenthal, 2014. "Are Private Markets and Filtering a Viable Source of Low-Income Housing? Estimates from a "Repeat Income" Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(2), pages 687-706, February.
    6. Iqbal A. Syed & Jan De Haan, 2017. "Age, Time, Vintage, And Price Indexes: Measuring The Depreciation Pattern Of Houses," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 580-600, January.
    7. Vincent Viguie & Stéphane Hallegatte & Julie Rozenberg, 2014. "Downscaling long term socio-economic scenarios at city scale: A case study on Paris," Post-Print hal-01136217, HAL.
    8. Michael Funke & Petar Mihaylovski & Adrian Wende, 2018. "Out of Sync Subnational Housing Markets and Macroprudential Policies," CESifo Working Paper Series 6887, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Wei Gao & Daniel Chi Wing Ho, 2011. "Collectivism in Apartment Building Management in Hong Kong," ERES eres2011_154, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    10. Koji Karato & Oleksandr Movshuk & Chihiro Shimizu, 2015. "Semiparametric Model of Hedonic Housing Prices in Japan," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 325-345, December.
    11. Hiroshi Sato & Terry Sicular & Ximing Yue, 2011. "Housing Ownership, Incomes, and Inequality in China, 2002-2007," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 201112, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
    12. Yung Yau, 2011. "Willingness to Participate in Collective Action: The Case of Multi-owner Housing Management," ERES eres2011_155, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    13. Viguié, Vincent & Hallegatte, Stéphane & Rozenberg, Julie, 2014. "Downscaling long term socio-economic scenarios at city scale: A case study on Paris," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 305-324.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R3 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:17:y:2008:i:1:p:88-101. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622881 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.