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Economic Depreciation of Residential Real Estate: Microlevel Space and Time Analysis

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  • Brent C Smith

Abstract

Three elements in the study of real estate depreciation that warrant further consideration are uncovered: the spatial variation of depreciation on a micro scale, the variability of depreciation within a single market across time and the recognition of land value as an influence in modeling real property prices. Taken together, these three dimensions provide an opportunity to further expand the understanding of residential economic depreciation while enhancing the predictive power of real estate market models. The analytical results, utilizing a land-value-adjusted hedonic model, indicate that both the intramarket location and the year in which the property sold have significant impacts on the observed rate of economic depreciation. Such information is vitally important to policymakers and others interested in accurate modeling of real estate markets. Copyright 2004 by the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association

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  • Brent C Smith, 2004. "Economic Depreciation of Residential Real Estate: Microlevel Space and Time Analysis," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 32(1), pages 161-180, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:32:y:2004:i:1:p:161-180
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    Cited by:

    1. Xiao, Qin, 2010. "Systemic Stability of Housing and Mortgage Market: From the observable to the unobservable," MPRA Paper 23708, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Rosenthal, Stuart S., 2008. "Old homes, externalities, and poor neighborhoods. A model of urban decline and renewal," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 816-840, May.
    3. van Duijn, Mark & Rouwendal, Jan & Boersema, Richard, 2016. "Redevelopment of industrial heritage: Insights into external effects on house prices," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 91-107.
    4. John Corgel, 2007. "Technological Change as Reflected in Hotel Property Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 257-279, February.
    5. Wilhelmsson, Mats, 2008. "House price depreciation rates and level of maintenance," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 88-101, March.
    6. Chun-Chang Lee & Hsueh-Ling Fan, 2016. "The Impact of Administrative Characteristics and Residential Types on Income Capitalization Rates in Taipei, Taiwan," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 6(10), pages 602-619, October.
    7. Stuart S. Rosenthal, 2014. "Are Private Markets and Filtering a Viable Source of Low-Income Housing? Estimates from a "Repeat Income" Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(2), pages 687-706, February.
    8. Iqbal A. Syed & Jan De Haan, 2017. "Age, Time, Vintage, And Price Indexes: Measuring The Depreciation Pattern Of Houses," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 580-600, January.
    9. Jeffrey D. Fisher & Brent C Smith & Jerrold J. Stern & R. Brian Webb, 2005. "Analysis of Economic Depreciation for Multi-Family Property," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 27(4), pages 355-370.

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