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Measuring socioeconomic health inequalities in presence of multiple categorical information

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  • Makdissi, Paul
  • Yazbeck, Myra

Abstract

While many of the measurement approaches in health inequality measurement assume the existence of a ratio-scale variable, most of the health information available in population surveys is given in the form of categorical variables. Therefore, the well-known inequality indices may not always be readily applicable to measure health inequality as it may result in the arbitrariness of the health concentration index's value. In this paper, we address this problem by changing the dimension in which the categorical information is used. We therefore exploit the multi-dimensionality of this information, define a new ratio-scale health status variable and develop positional stochastic dominance conditions that can be implemented in a context of categorical variables. We also propose a parametric class of population health and socioeconomic health inequality indices. Finally we provide a twofold empirical illustration using the Joint Canada/United States Surveys of Health 2004 and the National Health Interview Survey 2010.

Suggested Citation

  • Makdissi, Paul & Yazbeck, Myra, 2014. "Measuring socioeconomic health inequalities in presence of multiple categorical information," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 84-95.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:34:y:2014:i:c:p:84-95
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2013.11.008
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Makdissi & Myra Yazbeck, 2014. "Robust Wagstaff Orderings of Distributions of Self-Reported Health Status," Discussion Papers Series 533, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    2. MUSSARD Stéphane & PI ALPERIN Maria Noel & THIREAU Véronique, 2016. "Aggregable Health Inequality Indices," LISER Working Paper Series 2016-11, LISER.
    3. Paul Allanson, 2016. "Monitoring income-related health differences between regions in Great Britain: a new measurement framework," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 292, Economic Studies, University of Dundee, revised Jul 2016.
    4. Mohamed Khaled & Paul Makdissi & Myra Yazbeck, 2016. "Income-Related Health Transfers Principles and Orderings of Joint Distributions of Income and Health," Discussion Papers Series 574, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    5. Makdissi, Paul & Yazbeck, Myra, 2016. "Avoiding blindness to health status in health achievement and health inequality measurement," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 39-47.
    6. Martyna Kobus & Marcin Jakubek, 2015. "Youth unemployment and mental health: dominance approach. Evidence from Poland," IBS Working Papers 4/2015, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    7. Frank A Cowell & Martyna Kobus & Radoslaw Kurek, 2017. "Welfare and Inequality Comparisons for Uni- and Multi-dimensional Distributions of Ordinal Data," STICERD - Public Economics Programme Discussion Papers 31, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    8. MUSSARD Stéphane & PI ALPERIN Maria Noel, 2016. "A Two-parameter Family of Socio-economic Health Inequality Indices: Accounting for Risk and Inequality Aversions," LISER Working Paper Series 2016-15, LISER.
    9. Mohamad A. Khaled & Paul Makdissi & Rami Tabri & Myra Yazbeck, 2016. "A Framework for Testing the Equality Between the Health Concentration Curve and the 45-Degree Line," Discussion Papers Series 577, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    10. Nesson, Erik T. & Robinson, Joshua J., 2015. "An information theory based framework for the measurement of population health," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 86-103.
    11. Alexander Silbersdorff & Julia Lynch & Stephan Klasen & Thomas Kneib, 2017. "Reconsidering the Income-Illness Relationship Using Distributional Regression: An Application to Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 931, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    12. Martyna Kobus & Radoslaw Kurek, 2017. "Copula-based measurement of interdependence for discrete distributions," Working Papers 431, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    13. Joan Costa-i-Font & Frank Cowell, 2016. "The Measurement of Health Inequalities: Does Status Matter?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6117, CESifo Group Munich.
    14. Makdissi, Paul & Sylla, Daouda & Yazbeck, Myra, 2013. "Decomposing health achievement and socioeconomic health inequalities in presence of multiple categorical information," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 964-968.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Population health; Socioeconomic health inequality; Health achievement; Categorical variables; Stochastic dominance;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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