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Where would you go for your next hospitalization?


  • Jung, Kyoungrae
  • Feldman, Roger
  • Scanlon, Dennis


We examine the effects of diverse dimensions of hospital quality - including consumers' perceptions of unobserved attributes - on future hospital choice. We utilize consumers' stated preference weights to obtain hospital-specific estimates of perceptions about unmeasured attributes such as reputation. We report three findings. First, consumers' perceptions of reputation and medical services contribute substantially to utility for a hospital choice. Second, consumers tend to select hospitals with high clinical quality scores even before the scores are publicized. However, the effect of clinical quality on hospital choice is relatively small. Third, satisfaction with a prior hospital admission has a large impact on future hospital choice. Our findings suggest that including measures of consumers' experience in report cards may increase their responsiveness to publicized information, but other strategies are needed to overcome the large effects of consumers' beliefs about other quality attributes.

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  • Jung, Kyoungrae & Feldman, Roger & Scanlon, Dennis, 2011. "Where would you go for your next hospitalization?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 832-841, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:4:p:832-841

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cutler, David & Landrum, Mary Beth & Huckman, Robert, 2004. "The Role of Information in Medical Markets: An Analysis of Publicly Reported Outcomes in Cardiac Surgery," Scholarly Articles 2640582, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    2. Jin, Ginger Zhe & Sorensen, Alan T., 2006. "Information and consumer choice: The value of publicized health plan ratings," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 248-275, March.
    3. Dranove, David & Sfekas, Andrew, 2008. "Start spreading the news: A structural estimate of the effects of New York hospital report cards," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1201-1207, September.
    4. Harris, Katherine M. & Keane, Michael P., 1998. "A model of health plan choice:: Inferring preferences and perceptions from a combination of revealed preference and attitudinal data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1-2), pages 131-157, November.
    5. David M. Cutler & Robert S. Huckman & Mary Beth Landrum, 2004. "The Role of Information in Medical Markets: An Analysis of Publicly Reported Outcomes in Cardiac Surgery," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 342-346, May.
    6. Harris, Katherine & Schultz, Jennifer & Feldman, Roger, 2002. "Measuring consumer perceptions of quality differences among competing health benefit plans," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 1-17, January.
    7. Chernew, Michael & Gowrisankaran, Gautam & Scanlon, Dennis P., 2008. "Learning and the value of information: Evidence from health plan report cards," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 144(1), pages 156-174, May.
    8. Abraham, Jean M. & Feldman, Roger & Carlin, Caroline & Christianson, Jon, 2006. "The effect of quality information on consumer health plan switching: Evidence from the Buyers Health Care Action Group," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 762-781, July.
    9. Torrance, George W., 1986. "Measurement of health state utilities for economic appraisal : A review," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 1-30, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Suzanne Ruwaard & Rudy Douven, 2014. "Quality and hospital choice for cataract treatments: the winner takes most," CPB Discussion Paper 272, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    2. Baltagi, Badi H. & Yen, Yin-Fang, 2014. "Hospital treatment rates and spillover effects: Does ownership matter?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 193-202.
    3. Gutacker, Nils & Siciliani, Luigi & Moscelli, Giuseppe & Gravelle, Hugh, 2016. "Choice of hospital: Which type of quality matters?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 230-246.
    4. Chou, Shin-Yi & Deily, Mary E. & Li, Suhui & Lu, Yi, 2014. "Competition and the impact of online hospital report cards," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 42-58.
    5. Roger Feldman & Kyoungrae Jung, 2012. "Testing the Hirshleifer–Riley Model: The Values of Information Sources for a Future Hospital Stay," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 355-371, September.
    6. Mennicken, Roman & Kolodziej, Ingo W.K. & Augurzky, Boris & Kreienberg, Rolf, 2014. "Concentration of gynaecology and obstetrics in Germany: Is comprehensive access at stake?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 118(3), pages 396-406.


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