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Physician division of labor and patient selection for outpatient procedures

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  • David, Guy
  • Neuman, Mark D.

Abstract

Little is known about the ability of incentives to influence decisions by physicians regarding choices of settings for care delivery. In the context of outpatient procedural care, the emergence of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) as alternatives to hospital-based outpatient departments (HOPDs) creates a unique opportunity to study this question. We advance a model where physicians' division of labor between ASCs and HOPDs affects the medical complexity of patients treated in low-acuity settings (i.e. ASCs). Analyses of outpatient surgical procedure data show that physicians working exclusively in low-acuity settings (i.e. ASCs) treat patients of significantly higher medical complexity in these settings than do physicians who also practice in higher-acuity settings (i.e. HOPDs). This discrepancy shrinks with increasing procedural risk and with increasing distance between ASCs and acute care hospitals.

Suggested Citation

  • David, Guy & Neuman, Mark D., 2011. "Physician division of labor and patient selection for outpatient procedures," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 381-391, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:2:p:381-391
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McGuire, Thomas G., 2000. "Physician agency," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 9, pages 461-536 Elsevier.
    2. Blomqvist, Ake & Leger, Pierre Thomas, 2005. "Information asymmetry, insurance, and the decision to hospitalize," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 775-793, July.
    3. Thomas G. McGuire & Mark V. Pauly, 1991. "Physician Response to Fee Changes with Multiple Payers," Papers 0015, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
    4. Jonathan Gruber & Maria Owings, 1996. "Physician Financial Incentives and Cesarean Section Delivery," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 27(1), pages 99-123, Spring.
    5. Guy David & Lorens A. Helmchen, 2011. "The Role of Task Adhesion in Limiting Specialization along the Medical Care Continuum," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 25(1), pages 24-44, March.
    6. Marinoso, Begona Garcia & Jelovac, Izabela, 2003. "GPs' payment contracts and their referral practice," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 617-635, July.
    7. Labelle, Roberta & Stoddart, Greg & Rice, Thomas, 1994. "A re-examination of the meaning and importance of supplier-induced demand," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 347-368, October.
    8. McGuire, Thomas G. & Pauly, Mark V., 1991. "Physician response to fee changes with multiple payers," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 385-410.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:nbr:nberch:13996 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Ellerie Weber, 2014. "Measuring Welfare from Ambulatory Surgery Centers: A Spatial Analysis of Demand for Healthcare Facilities," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 591-631, December.
    3. David H. Howard & Jason Hockenberry & Guy David, 2017. "Personalized Medicine When Physicians Induce Demand," NBER Working Papers 24054, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Yee, Christine A., 2011. "Physicians on board: An examination of physician financial interests in ASCs using longitudinal data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 904-918.

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