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A welfare measure of consumer vulnerability to rising prices of food imports in the UAE

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  • Azzam, Azzeddine M.
  • Rettab, Belaid

Abstract

The recent and expected continuing rise in food prices has re-ignited concern and discussion in the United Arab Emirates about the country’s vulnerability to food supply shocks. Defining vulnerability as the compensating variation relative to household income, we find that although UAE households in the lowest income quintile spend on food on average less than a quarter of what households in the highest income quintile spend, the former are 3.5 times more vulnerable to rising prices of food imports than the latter.

Suggested Citation

  • Azzam, Azzeddine M. & Rettab, Belaid, 2012. "A welfare measure of consumer vulnerability to rising prices of food imports in the UAE," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 554-560.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:37:y:2012:i:5:p:554-560
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2012.05.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Säll, Sarah, 2015. "Distributional effects of environmental meat taxes in Sweden- Can the poor still eat meat?," Working Paper Series 2015:3, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department Economics.
    2. Muhammad Arshad Haral & Mudassar Yasin, 2019. "Determinants of Speculative Demand of Wheat and Its Impact on Consumer Welfare Loss," Journal of Economic Impact, Journal of Economic Impact, vol. 1(3), pages 87-91.
    3. Säll, Sarah, 2018. "Environmental food taxes and inequalities: Simulation of a meat tax in Sweden," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 147-153.
    4. Marktanner, Marcus & Merkel, Almuth, 2019. "Hunger and Anger in Autocracies and Democracies," International Journal of Development and Conflict, Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics, vol. 9(1), pages 1-18.
    5. Mona Aghabeygi & Filippo Arfini, 2020. "Assessing the Net Import Welfare Impacts of the Rising Global Price of Food in Italy," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-10, February.
    6. Tschirley, David & Myers, Robert & Zavale, Helder, 2014. "MSU/FSG Study of the Impact of WFP Local and Regional Food Aid Procurement on Markets, Households, and Food Value Chains," Food Security International Development Working Papers 184835, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Arfini, Filippo & Aghabeygi, Mona, 2018. "Evaluation of Welfare Effects of Rising Price of Food Imports in Italy," 162nd Seminar, April 26-27, 2018, Budapest, Hungary 271953, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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