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What happened to liquidity when world war I shut the NYSE?

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  • Silber, William L.

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  • Silber, William L., 2005. "What happened to liquidity when world war I shut the NYSE?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(3), pages 685-701, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:78:y:2005:i:3:p:685-701
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hans R. Stoll, 2000. "Presidential Address: Friction," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(4), pages 1479-1514, August.
    2. Silber, William L, 1984. " Marketmaker Behavior in an Auction Market: An Analysis of Scalpers in Futures Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 39(4), pages 937-953, September.
    3. Milton Friedman & Anna J. Schwartz, 1963. "A Monetary History of the United States, 1867–1960," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie63-1, December.
    4. Michael J. Fleming & Kenneth D. Garbade, 2002. "When the back office moved to the front burner: settlement fails in the treasury market after 9/11," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Nov, pages 35-57.
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    Cited by:

    1. Asaf Bernstein & Eric Hughson & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2008. "Can a Lender of Last Resort Stabilize Financial Markets? Lessons from the Founding of the Fed," NBER Working Papers 14422, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Loviscek, Anthony & Tang, Hongfei & Xu, Xiaoqing Eleanor, 2014. "Do leveraged exchange-traded products deliver their stated multiples?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 29-47.
    3. Boucher, Christophe M. & Daníelsson, Jón & Kouontchou, Patrick S. & Maillet, Bertrand B., 2014. "Risk models-at-risk," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 72-92.
    4. Gabriel P. Mathy & Matthew Jaremski, 2016. "How Was the Quantitative Easing Program of the 1930s Unwound?," Working Papers 2016-01, American University, Department of Economics.
    5. Fu, Renhui & Kraft, Arthur & Zhang, Huai, 2012. "Financial reporting frequency, information asymmetry, and the cost of equity," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 132-149.
    6. Ran Lu-Andrews & John L. Glascock, 2017. "Liquidity, Price Behavior, and Market-related Events," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 43(2), pages 318-351, March.
    7. William O. Brown, Jr. & J. Harold Mulherin & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2006. "Competing With the NYSE," NBER Working Papers 12343, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Bernstein, Asaf & Hughson, Eric & Weidenmier, Marc D., 2010. "Identifying the effects of a lender of last resort on financial markets: Lessons from the founding of the fed," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 40-53, October.
    9. Silber, William L., 2006. "Birth of the Federal Reserve: Crisis in the womb," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 351-368, March.
    10. Jopp, Tobias A., 2017. "How does the public perceive alliances? The Central and Allied Powers in World War I," IBF Paper Series 12-17, IBF – Institut für Bank- und Finanzgeschichte / Institute for Banking and Financial History, Frankfurt am Main.
    11. Caroline Fohlin, 2016. "When 'No News' is Bad News: Complexity and Uncertainty in the Global Crisis of 1914," Emory Economics 1606, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
    12. Acheson, Graeme G. & Coyle, Christopher & Turner, John D., 2018. "Prices and informed trading: Evidence from an early stock market," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2018-05, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    13. Acheson, Graeme G. & Coyle, Christopher & Jordan, David P. & Turner, John D., 2018. "Share trading activity and the rise of the rentier in the UK before 1920," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2018-04, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.

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