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Stereotypes in intertemporal choice

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  • McLeish, Kendra N.
  • Oxoby, Robert J.

Abstract

We conduct a laboratory experiment exploring the existence of stereotypes in intertemporal decision-making. Participants were asked to predict intertemporal decisions made by third parties described only by age and gender. We find evidence of significant age and gender stereotyping with respect to intertemporal preferences. Interestingly, gender stereotyping is asymmetric across gender of respondent, with members of each gender viewing themselves as more patient than members of the other gender. We discuss these results in light of evidence of asymmetries in how physicians and other professionals provide recommendations based on a patient's demographic characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • McLeish, Kendra N. & Oxoby, Robert J., 2009. "Stereotypes in intertemporal choice," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 70(1-2), pages 135-141, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:70:y:2009:i:1-2:p:135-141
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Catherine C. Eckel & Philip J. Grossman, 2002. "Sex Differences and Statistical Stereotyping in Attitudes Toward Financial Risk," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-03, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    2. McLeish, Kendra N. & Oxoby, Robert J., 2007. "Gender, Affect and Intertemporal Consistency: An Experimental Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 2663, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Ted O'Donoghue & Matthew Rabin, 2001. "Risky Behavior among Youths: Some Issues from Behavioral Economics," NBER Chapters,in: Risky Behavior among Youths: An Economic Analysis, pages 29-68 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Eckel, Catherine C & Grossman, Philip J, 2001. "Chivalry and Solidarity in Ultimatum Games," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(2), pages 171-188, April.
    5. Maribeth Coller & Melonie Williams, 1999. "Eliciting Individual Discount Rates," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 2(2), pages 107-127, December.
    6. Matthew Rabin, 1998. "Psychology and Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 11-46, March.
    7. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lu, Yang & Zhuang, Xintian, 2014. "The impact of gender and working experience on intertemporal choices," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 409(C), pages 146-153.
    2. Franziska Ziegelmeyer & Michael Ziegelmeyer, 2016. "Parenting is risky business: parental risk attitudes in small stakes decisions on behalf of their children," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 599-623, September.

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