IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jeborg/v46y2001i4p395-408.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Productivity growth, increasing income inequality and social insurance: the case of China?

Author

Listed:
  • Yui Leung, Charles Ka

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Yui Leung, Charles Ka, 2001. "Productivity growth, increasing income inequality and social insurance: the case of China?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 395-408, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:46:y:2001:i:4:p:395-408
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167-2681(01)00163-9
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rogerson, William P, 1985. "The First-Order Approach to Principal-Agent Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1357-1367, November.
    2. Fung, Michael K. Y. & Ho, Wai-Ming & Zhu, Lijing, 2000. "Stagflationary effect of government bond financing in the transforming Chinese economy: a general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 111-135, February.
    3. Greenwood, Jeremy & Jovanovic, Boyan, 1990. "Financial Development, Growth, and the Distribution of Income," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 1076-1107, October.
    4. Jong-Il Kim & Lawrence J. Lau, 1996. "The sources of Asian Pacific economic growth," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(s1), pages 448-454, April.
    5. Eric Hanushek & Ban Chuan Cheah & Charles Ka-Yui Leung, 1997. "Redistribution through Education: The case of pure material cost," Departmental Working Papers _084, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics.
    6. Brixiova, Zuzana & Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro, 1997. "Private sector development in transition economies," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 241-279, June.
    7. Epstein, Larry G & Wang, Tan, 1994. "Intertemporal Asset Pricing Under Knightian Uncertainty," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(2), pages 283-322, March.
    8. Alan Gelb & Gary Jefferson & Inderjit Singh, 1993. "Can Communist Economies Transform Incrementally? The Experience of China," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1993, Volume 8, pages 87-150 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Leung, Charles Ka Yui & Zhang, Guang-Jia, 2000. "Inflation and capital gains taxes in a small open economy," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 195-208, July.
    10. Young, Alwyn, 1994. "Lessons from the East Asian NICS: A contrarian view," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 964-973, April.
    11. Rebelo, Sergio, 1991. "Long-Run Policy Analysis and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 500-521, June.
    12. Alwyn Young, 1995. "The Tyranny of Numbers: Confronting the Statistical Realities of the East Asian Growth Experience," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 641-680.
    13. Leung, Charles Ka Yui, 1999. "Income Tax, Property Tax, and Tariff in a Small Open Economy," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(3), pages 541-554, August.
    14. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Huffman, Gregory W, 1988. "Investment, Capacity Utilization, and the Real Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(3), pages 402-417, June.
    15. Gelb, Alan & Jefferson, Gary & Singh, Inderjit, 1993. "Can Communist economies transform incrementally? China's experience," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1189, The World Bank.
    16. Larry G. Epstein, 1999. "A Definition of Uncertainty Aversion," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(3), pages 579-608.
    17. Charles Ka Yui Leung, 1995. "Educated guesses and income distribution," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 173-177, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Charles Leung & Sam Tang & Nicolaas Groenewold, 2006. "Growth Volatility and Technical Progress: A Simple Rent-seeking Model," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 88(2), pages 159-178, August.
    2. Michio Naoi & Miki Seko & Kazuto Sumita, 2010. "Community Rating, Cross Subsidies and Underinsurance: Why so many Households in Japan do not Purchase Earthquake Insurance," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 544-561, May.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:46:y:2001:i:4:p:395-408. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.