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Income Tax, Property Tax, and Tariff in a Small Open Economy

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  • Leung, Charles Ka Yui

Abstract

Why do some countries enjoy high economic growth rates while some suffer in "low-growth traps"? Why are tax policies in different countries so different? Some suggest that it is exactly these differences in government policies which contribute to the difference in economic growth rates. This paper considers a small open economy which sustains its economic growth by adopting new technologies. When the value of initial wealth is "relatively small," policies which promote growth most result in the highest welfare. In other cases, policies that discourage growth most may be welfare-maximizing. Copyright 1999 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Leung, Charles Ka Yui, 1999. "Income Tax, Property Tax, and Tariff in a Small Open Economy," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(3), pages 541-554, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:7:y:1999:i:3:p:541-54
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    Cited by:

    1. Leung, Charles, 2004. "Macroeconomics and housing: a review of the literature," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 249-267, December.
    2. Creina Day & Garth Day, 2010. "Taxes, Growth And The Current Account Tick-Curve Effect," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 13-27, March.
    3. Creina Day & Garth Day, 2007. "Fiscal Reform, Growth and Current Account Dynamics," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2007-485, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    4. Shin-Kun Peng & Ping Wang, 2009. "A Normative Analysis of Housing-Related Tax Policy in a General Equilibrium Model of Housing Quality and Prices," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 11(5), pages 667-696, October.
    5. Zhang, Yan, 2009. "Tariff and Equilibrium Indeterminacy," MPRA Paper 13099, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Yui Leung, Charles Ka, 2001. "Productivity growth, increasing income inequality and social insurance: the case of China?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 395-408, December.
    7. Zhang, Yan, 2008. "Tariff and Equilibrium Indeterminacy," MPRA Paper 11370, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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