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Coordination with endogenous groups

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  • Chen, Roy

Abstract

The endogenous choice of groups can have an important effect on coordination behavior, but it is an underexplored area of research. In this study, I examine how endogenous group choice affects coordination in a laboratory setting using the minimum-effort game. Most studies on coordination use randomly assigned groups, with some showing that successful coordination can be achieved if the subjects have some social interaction. This study shows that an alternative strategy to improving coordination behavior and equilibrium play is to allow subjects some choice over their group membership.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Roy, 2017. "Coordination with endogenous groups," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 177-187.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:141:y:2017:i:c:p:177-187
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2017.07.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli & Luigi Luini, 2017. "Does Focality Depend on the Mode of Cognition? Experimental Evidence on Pure Coordination Games," Department of Economics University of Siena 771, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    2. repec:eee:jeborg:v:148:y:2018:i:c:p:20-33 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Experiment; Endogenous groups; Coordination; Minimum-effort game;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations

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