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The role of surprise: Understanding overreaction and underreaction to unanticipated events using in-play soccer betting market

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  • Choi, Darwin
  • Hui, Sam K.

Abstract

Previous research in finance has found evidences of both overreaction and underreaction to unanticipated events, but has yet to explain why investors overreact to certain events while underreacting to others. In this paper, we hypothesize that while market participants generally underreact to new events due to conservatism, the extent of underreaction is moderated by “surprise,” thus causing market participants to overreact to events that are highly surprising. We test our hypothesis using data from an in-play soccer betting market, where new events (goals) are clearly and exogenously defined, and the degree of “surprise” can be directly quantified (goals scored by underdogs are more surprising). We provide both statistical and economic evidences in support of our hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Choi, Darwin & Hui, Sam K., 2014. "The role of surprise: Understanding overreaction and underreaction to unanticipated events using in-play soccer betting market," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 107(PB), pages 614-629.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:107:y:2014:i:pb:p:614-629
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2014.02.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Oliver Merz & Raphael Flepp & Egon Franck, 2019. "Does sentiment harm market efficiency? An empirical analysis using a betting exchange setting," Working Papers 381, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    2. Kai Fischer & Justus Haucap, 2020. "Betting Market Efficiency in the Presence of Unfamiliar Shocks: The Case of Ghost Games during the Covid-19 Pandemic," CESifo Working Paper Series 8526, CESifo.
    3. Giovanni Angelini & Luca De Angelis & Carl Singleton, 2019. "Informational efficiency and price reaction within in-play prediction markets," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-20, Department of Economics, Reading University.
    4. Piccoli, Pedro & Chaudhury, Mo & Souza, Alceu, 2017. "How do stocks react to extreme market events? Evidence from Brazil," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 275-284.
    5. Bizzozero, Paolo & Flepp, Raphael & Franck, Egon, 2018. "The effect of fast trading on price discovery and efficiency: Evidence from a betting exchange," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 126-143.
    6. Michael Ehrmann & David‐Jan Jansen, 2017. "The Pitch Rather Than the Pit: Investor Inattention, Trading Activity, and FIFA World Cup Matches," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 49(4), pages 807-821, June.
    7. Paolo Bizzozero & Raphael Flepp & Egon Franck, 2017. " Insider trading and price efficiency: Evidence from a betting exchange," Working Papers 368, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    8. Alasdair Brown & Dooruj Rambaccussing & J. James Reade & Giambattista Rossi, 2018. "Forecasting With Social Media: Evidence From Tweets On Soccer Matches," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(3), pages 1748-1763, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Over/underreaction; Unanticipated events; Surprise; Conservatism; Prediction market; Bayesian dynamic model;

    JEL classification:

    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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