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Comparing China's GDP statistics with coincident indicators

  • Mehrotra, Aaron
  • Pääkkönen, Jenni

We use factor analysis to summarize information from various macroeconomic indicators, effectively producing coincident indicators for the Chinese economy. We compare the dynamics of the estimated factors with GDP, and compare our factors with other published indicators for the Chinese economy. The estimated factors and the published coincident indicators match the GDP dynamics well and discrepancies are very short. The largest discrepancies may correspond to shocks affecting the growth process.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0147596711000187
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Comparative Economics.

Volume (Year): 39 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 406-411

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:39:y:2011:i:3:p:406-411
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622864

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