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To what extent does employer-paid health insurance reduce the use of public hospitals?

  • Søgaard, Rikke
  • Pedersen, Morten Saaby
  • Bech, Mickael

This study examines the extent to which employer-paid health insurance has led to substitution of public with private hospital use in Denmark.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Health Policy.

Volume (Year): 113 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 61-68

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Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:113:y:2013:i:1:p:61-68
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  1. �ngel Marcos Vera-Hernández, 1999. "Duplicate coverage and demand for health care. The case of Catalonia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(7), pages 579-598.
  2. Gertler, Paul & Sturm, Roland, 1997. "Private health insurance and public expenditures in Jamaica," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 237-257, March.
  3. Van Doorslaer, Eddy & Clarke, Philip & Savage, Elizabeth & Hall, Jane, 2008. "Horizontal inequities in Australia's mixed public/private health care system," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 97-108, April.
  4. Pedro Pita Barros & Matilde P. Machado & Anna Sanz de Galdeano, 2005. "Moral Hazard And The Demand For Health Services: A Matching Estimator Approach," Economics Working Papers we055928, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  5. Francesca Colombo & Nicole Tapay, 2004. "Private Health Insurance in OECD Countries: The Benefits and Costs for Individuals and Health Systems," OECD Health Working Papers 15, OECD Publishing.
  6. Moorin, Rachael Elizabeth & Holman, Cashel D'Arcy J., 2006. "Does federal health care policy influence switching between the public and private sectors in individuals?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 79(2-3), pages 284-295, December.
  7. Tim Besley & John Hall & Ian Preston, 1996. "The demand for private health insurance: do waiting lists matter?," IFS Working Papers W96/07, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Mark Stabile, 2001. "Private insurance subsidies and public health care markets: evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(4), pages 921-942, November.
  9. Caliendo, Marco & Kopeinig, Sabine, 2005. "Some Practical Guidance for the Implementation of Propensity Score Matching," IZA Discussion Papers 1588, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Guido W. Imbens, 2004. "Nonparametric Estimation of Average Treatment Effects Under Exogeneity: A Review," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 4-29, February.
  11. Jonathan Gruber & Brigitte C. Madrian, 2002. "Health Insurance, Labor Supply, and Job Mobility: A Critical Review of the Literature," NBER Working Papers 8817, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Seshamani, Meena & Gray, Alastair M., 2004. "A longitudinal study of the effects of age and time to death on hospital costs," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 217-235, March.
  13. Alberto Abadie & Guido W. Imbens, 2006. "Large Sample Properties of Matching Estimators for Average Treatment Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(1), pages 235-267, 01.
  14. Sara Moreira & Pedro Pita Barros, 2010. "Double health insurance coverage and health care utilisation: evidence from quantile regression," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(9), pages 1075-1092, September.
  15. repec:adr:anecst:y:2006:i:83-84:p:10 is not listed on IDEAS
  16. Kiil, Astrid, 2012. "What characterises the privately insured in universal health care systems? A review of the empirical evidence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 60-75.
  17. Astrid Kiil, 2012. "Does employment-based private health insurance increase the use of covered health care services? A matching estimator approach," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-38, March.
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