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Tropical forest susceptibility to and risk of fire under changing climate: A review of fire nature, policy and institutions in Indonesia

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  • Herawati, Hety
  • Santoso, Heru

Abstract

Forest fire is of both local and global concern. Large scale fires are not part of the natural disturbance of tropical rain forests but this threat has increased in the last few decades. Under global warming, Indonesia is projected to have higher temperatures and changes in rainfall patterns. Southern Indonesia is predicted to be drier whereas the north is likely to become wetter. Inter-annual climate variability associated with phenomena such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation may cause big decreases in rainfall. This paper reviews the nature and extent of fire problem and the effectiveness of the current policy and institutional provisions in Indonesia in addressing forest fires under projected future climate change. We then consider possible strategies for improving their effectiveness. The review results indicate that first, Indonesia has enacted a number of regulations and established various institutions to tackle forest and other wildfires, but these have proved ineffective. Second, under future climate change scenarios and current fire management practices, Indonesia's tropical rain forests could be more susceptible to fire. Third, effectiveness could be improved by addressing the underlying causes of fires, involving a wide range of stakeholders in formulating the regulations and enhancing law enforcement.

Suggested Citation

  • Herawati, Hety & Santoso, Heru, 2011. "Tropical forest susceptibility to and risk of fire under changing climate: A review of fire nature, policy and institutions in Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 227-233, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:13:y:2011:i:4:p:227-233
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Johann Goldammer, 2007. "History of equatorial vegetation fires and fire research in Southeast Asia before the 1997–98 episode: A reconstruction of creeping environmental changes," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 13-32, January.
    2. Daniel Murdiyarso & Erna Adiningsih, 2007. "Climate anomalies, Indonesian vegetation fires and terrestrial carbon emissions," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 101-112, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Santika, Truly & Wilson, Kerrie A. & Meijaard, Erik & Budiharta, Sugeng & Law, Elizabeth E. & Sabri, Meindra & Struebig, Matthew & Ancrenaz, Marc & Poh, Tun-Min, 2019. "Changing landscapes, livelihoods and village welfare in the context of oil palm development," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 87(C).
    2. Massimiliano Agovino & Massimiliano Cerciello & Aniello Ferraro & Antonio Garofalo, 2021. "Spatial analysis of wildfire incidence in the USA: the role of climatic spillovers," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 6084-6105, April.
    3. Uda, Saritha Kittie & Schouten, Greetje & Hein, Lars, 2020. "The institutional fit of peatland governance in Indonesia," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 99(C).
    4. Meehan, Fiona & Tacconi, Luca & Budiningsih, Kushartati, 2019. "Are national commitments to reducing emissions from forests effective? Lessons from Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 1-1.
    5. Chakrabarti, Averi, 2021. "Deforestation and infant mortality: Evidence from Indonesia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 40(C).
    6. Watts, John D. & Tacconi, Luca & Hapsari, Nindita & Irawan, Silvia & Sloan, Sean & Widiastomo, Triyoga, 2019. "Incentivizing compliance: Evaluating the effectiveness of targeted village incentives for reducing burning in Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 1-1.
    7. Massimiliano Agovino & Massimiliano Cerciello & Aniello Ferraro & Antonio Garofalo, 0. "Spatial analysis of wildfire incidence in the USA: the role of climatic spillovers," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-22.
    8. Naderpour, Mohsen & Rizeei, Hossein Mojaddadi & Khakzad, Nima & Pradhan, Biswajeet, 2019. "Forest fire induced Natech risk assessment: A survey of geospatial technologies," Reliability Engineering and System Safety, Elsevier, vol. 191(C).
    9. Zeeshan Shirazi & Huadong Guo & Fang Chen & Bo Yu & Bin Li, 2017. "Assessing the impact of climatic parameters and their inter-annual seasonal variability on fire activity using time series satellite products in South China (2001–2014)," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 85(3), pages 1393-1416, February.

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