IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/forpol/v108y2019ic5.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Incentivizing compliance: Evaluating the effectiveness of targeted village incentives for reducing burning in Indonesia

Author

Listed:
  • Watts, John D.
  • Tacconi, Luca
  • Hapsari, Nindita
  • Irawan, Silvia
  • Sloan, Sean
  • Widiastomo, Triyoga

Abstract

Periodic peat and forest fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan result in haze that blankets Indonesia and neighboring countries, with effects on human health, the environment and the economy. Although the prevailing approach for preventing and reducing the incidence of fire in Indonesia is regulatory, village-level incentive schemes have been trialed by agribusinesses and pulp and paper companies to prevent burning. In this article, we review one integrated incentive program for villages launched by a pulp and paper company in Riau, Sumatra, in 2015. As part of the study, we surveyed six of the villages that participated in the first year of the program as well as six non-program villages, complemented by spatial analyses of hotspots and burn scars. Our analyses show a declining pattern of burning in the years prior and including 2015, followed by the almost total cessation of burning in the years after. During 2015, a severe El Niño event, the program villages experienced 40% fewer fires, while in non-program villages, there were 23% more fires. The main reason cited by the villages was the increased awareness of the regulations in force prior to the program. The information about these laws and regulations had been disseminated to program villages, as well as some of the adjacent non-program villages, prior to the commencement of the incentive program. The transition to non-burning livelihoods was enabled by ongoing changes in the landscape to permanent agricultural crops such as oil palm and rubber, as well as non-farming livelihoods. Although the benefits of the program were valued at the community level, the incentives appeared to function as a pathway for incentivizing compliance with prevailing regulations rather than inducing voluntary behaviors. We argue that the current trend for strict environmental regulations undermines the potential for using voluntary incentives. Consequently, we suggest that future incentive schemes should focus on providing agricultural support to smallholders to enable them to adapt to the strict requirements of the environmental regulations in force.

Suggested Citation

  • Watts, John D. & Tacconi, Luca & Hapsari, Nindita & Irawan, Silvia & Sloan, Sean & Widiastomo, Triyoga, 2019. "Incentivizing compliance: Evaluating the effectiveness of targeted village incentives for reducing burning in Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 1-1.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:108:y:2019:i:c:5
    DOI: 10.1016/j.forpol.2019.101956
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1389934118302892
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.forpol.2019.101956?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wunder, Sven, 2015. "Revisiting the concept of payments for environmental services," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 234-243.
    2. Cacho, Oscar J. & Milne, Sarah & Gonzalez, Ricardo & Tacconi, Luca, 2014. "Benefits and costs of deforestation by smallholders: Implications for forest conservation and climate policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 321-332.
    3. Tacconi, Luca, 2012. "Redefining payments for environmental services," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 29-36.
    4. Dicky Simorangkir, 2007. "Fire use: Is it really the cheaper land preparation method for large-scale plantations?," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 147-164, January.
    5. Herawati, Hety & Santoso, Heru, 2011. "Tropical forest susceptibility to and risk of fire under changing climate: A review of fire nature, policy and institutions in Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 227-233, April.
    6. L. Tacconi & P. Moore & D. Kaimowitz, 2007. "Fires in tropical forests – what is really the problem? lessons from Indonesia," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 55-66, January.
    7. Hans Antlöv & Anna Wetterberg & Leni Dharmawan, 2016. "Village Governance, Community Life, and the 2014 Village Law in Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(2), pages 161-183, May.
    8. Purnomo, Herry & Shantiko, Bayuni & Sitorus, Soaduon & Gunawan, Harris & Achdiawan, Ramadhani & Kartodihardjo, Hariadi & Dewayani, Ade Ayu, 2017. "Fire economy and actor network of forest and land fires in Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 21-31.
    9. Byerlee, Derek & Falcon, Walter P. & Naylor, Rosamond L., 2016. "The Tropical Oil Crop Revolution: Food, Feed, Fuel, and Forests," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780190222987.
    10. Krott, Max & Bader, Axel & Schusser, Carsten & Devkota, Rosan & Maryudi, Ahmad & Giessen, Lukas & Aurenhammer, Helene, 2014. "Actor-centred power: The driving force in decentralised community based forest governance," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 34-42.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sofiyuddin, Muhammad & Suyanto, S. & Kadir, Sabarudin & Dewi, Sonya, 2021. "Sustainable land preparation for farmer-managed lowland agriculture in Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C).
    2. Meehan, Fiona & Tacconi, Luca & Budiningsih, Kushartati, 2019. "Are national commitments to reducing emissions from forests effective? Lessons from Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 1-1.
    3. Tacconi, Luca & Muttaqin, Muhammad Zahrul, 2019. "Policy forum: Institutional architecture and activities to reduce emissions from forests in Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 1-1.
    4. Trihadmojo, Bambang & Jones, Christopher R. & Prasastyoga, Bramesada & Walton, Chris & Sulaiman, Ahmad, 2020. "Toward a nuanced and targeted forest and peat fires prevention policy: Insight from psychology," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).
    5. Tacconi, Luca & Muttaqin, Muhammad Zahrul, 2019. "Reducing emissions from land use change in Indonesia: An overview," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 1-1.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Watts, John D. & Tacconi, Luca & Irawan, Silvia & Wijaya, Aklan H., 2019. "Village transfers for the environment: Lessons from community-based development programs and the village fund," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 1-1.
    2. Sofiyuddin, Muhammad & Suyanto, S. & Kadir, Sabarudin & Dewi, Sonya, 2021. "Sustainable land preparation for farmer-managed lowland agriculture in Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C).
    3. Purnomo, Herry & Okarda, Beni & Dewayani, Ade Ayu & Ali, Made & Achdiawan, Ramadhani & Kartodihardjo, Hariadi & Pacheco, Pablo & Juniwaty, Kartika S., 2018. "Reducing forest and land fires through good palm oil value chain governance," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 94-106.
    4. Hausknost, Daniel & Grima, Nelson & Singh, Simron Jit, 2017. "The political dimensions of Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES): Cascade or stairway?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 109-118.
    5. Desbureaux, Sébastien & Brimont, Laura, 2015. "Between economic loss and social identity: The multi-dimensional cost of avoiding deforestation in Eastern Madagascar," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 10-20.
    6. Trædal, Leif Tore & Vedeld, Pål Olav & Pétursson, Jón Geir, 2016. "Analyzing the transformations of forest PES in Vietnam: Implications for REDD+," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 109-117.
    7. Mangubhai, Sangeeta & Sykes, Helen & Manley, Marita & Vukikomoala, Kiji & Beattie, Madeline, 2020. "Contributions of tourism-based Marine Conservation Agreements to natural resource management in Fiji," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 171(C).
    8. Driss Ezzine-de-Blas & Sven Wunder & Manuel Ruiz-Pérez & Rocio del Pilar Moreno-Sanchez, 2016. "Global Patterns in the Implementation of Payments for Environmental Services," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(3), pages 1-16, March.
    9. Lin, Yongsheng & Dong, Zhanfeng & Zhang, Wei & Zhang, Hongyu, 2020. "Estimating inter-regional payments for ecosystem services: Taking China’s Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region as an example," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 168(C).
    10. Purnomo, Herry & Kusumadewi, Sonya D. & Ilham, Qori P. & Puspitaloka, Dyah & Hayati, Durrah & Sanjaya, Made & Okarda, Beni & Dewi, Sonya & Dermawan, Ahmad & Brady, Michael A., 2021. "A political-economy model to reduce fire and improve livelihoods in Indonesia's lowlands," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C).
    11. Blundo-Canto, Genowefa & Bax, Vincent & Quintero, Marcela & Cruz-Garcia, Gisella S. & Groeneveld, Rolf A. & Perez-Marulanda, Lisset, 2018. "The Different Dimensions of Livelihood Impacts of Payments for Environmental Services (PES) Schemes: A Systematic Review," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 160-183.
    12. Ezzine-de-Blas, Driss & Corbera, Esteve & Lapeyre, Renaud, 2019. "Payments for Environmental Services and Motivation Crowding: Towards a Conceptual Framework," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 434-443.
    13. Edwards, Ryan B. & Naylor, Rosamond L. & Higgins, Matthew M. & Falcon, Walter P., 2020. "Causes of Indonesia’s forest fires," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
    14. West, Thales A.P. & Monge, Juan J. & Dowling, Les J. & Wakelin, Steve J. & Gibbs, Holly K., 2020. "Promotion of afforestation in New Zealand’s marginal agricultural lands through payments for environmental services," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 46(C).
    15. Martin-Ortega, Julia & Waylen, Kerry A., 2018. "PES What a Mess? An Analysis of the Position of Environmental Professionals in the Conceptual Debate on Payments for Ecosystem Services," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 218-237.
    16. Etchart, Nicolle & Freire, José Luis & Holland, Margaret B. & Jones, Kelly W. & Naughton-Treves, Lisa, 2020. "What happens when the money runs out? Forest outcomes and equity concerns following Ecuador’s suspension of conservation payments," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 136(C).
    17. Duong, Ngoc T.B. & de Groot, Wouter T., 2018. "Distributional risk in PES: Exploring the concept in the Payment for Environmental Forest Services program, Vietnam," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 22-32.
    18. Di Corato, Luca & Dosi, Cesare & Moretto, Michele, 2018. "Multidimensional auctions for long-term procurement contracts with early-exit options: The case of conservation contracts," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 267(1), pages 368-380.
    19. Brimont, L. & Karsenty, A., 2015. "Between incentives and coercion: the thwarted implementation of PES schemes in Madagascar׳s dense forests," Ecosystem Services, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 113-121.
    20. Maldonado, Jorge H. & Moreno-Sanchez, Rocio & Henao-Henao, Juan P. & Bruner, Aaron, 2019. "Does exclusion matter in conservation agreements? A case of mangrove users in the Ecuadorian coast using participatory choice experiments," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 1-1.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:108:y:2019:i:c:5. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forpol .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.