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Make-take decisions under high-frequency trading competition

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  • Bernales, Alejandro

Abstract

The make-take preferences of investors depend on high-frequency trading (HFT) competition, under which HFT firms endogenously acquire speed and informational advantages. In the case where there are many HFT firms in the market, they compete more through limit orders; meanwhile, in the case with few HFT firms, they compete more through market orders that “pick-off" limit orders coming from the big crowd of slow traders. In the former (latter) case, additional HFT competition improves (damage) liquidity. In both cases, HFT competition improves informational efficiency and reduces microstructure noise. Finally, I use the model to analyze potential regulations under HFT competition.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernales, Alejandro, 2019. "Make-take decisions under high-frequency trading competition," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-18.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finmar:v:45:y:2019:i:c:p:1-18
    DOI: 10.1016/j.finmar.2019.05.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Make-take decisions; High-frequency trading competition; Limit order market; Market quality; Welfare;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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