IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/tse/wpaper/32372.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Is Trading Fast Dangerous?

Author

Listed:
  • Foucault, Thierry
  • Moinas, Sophie

Abstract

The speed of trading has considerably increased in recent years, due to progress in information technologies and automation of the trading process. This evolution raises many questions about the effects of trading speed. In this chapter we discuss the findings of the growing theoretical and empirical literature on trading speed in financial markets. We argue that an increase in trading speed raises adverse selection costs but increases competition among liquidity providers and the rate at which gains from trade are realized. Thus, the effect of an increase in trading speed on market quality and welfare is inherently ambiguous. This observation is important for assessing empirical findings regarding the effects of trading speed and policy making.

Suggested Citation

  • Foucault, Thierry & Moinas, Sophie, 2018. "Is Trading Fast Dangerous?," TSE Working Papers 18-881, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
  • Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:32372
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.tse-fr.eu/sites/default/files/TSE/documents/doc/wp/2018/wp_tse_881.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cordella, Tito & Foucault, Thierry, 1999. "Minimum Price Variations, Time Priority, and Quote Dynamics," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 141-173, July.
    2. Breckenfelder, Johannes, 2013. "Competition between high-frequency traders, and market quality," MPRA Paper 66715, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Dec 2013.
    3. Thierry Foucault & Roman Kozhan & Wing Wah Tham, 2017. "Toxic Arbitrage," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 1053-1094.
    4. Thierry Foucault & Albert J. Menkveld, 2008. "Competition for Order Flow and Smart Order Routing Systems," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(1), pages 119-158, February.
    5. Albert J. Menkveld & Marius A. Zoican, 2017. "Need for Speed? Exchange Latency and Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 1188-1228.
    6. Burton Hollifield & Robert A. Miller & Patrik Sandås & Joshua Slive, 2006. "Estimating the Gains from Trade in Limit-Order Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(6), pages 2753-2804, December.
    7. Hoag, Christopher, 2006. "The Atlantic Telegraph Cable and Capital Market Information Flows," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(02), pages 342-353, June.
    8. Terrence Hendershott & Charles M. Jones & Albert J. Menkveld, 2011. "Does Algorithmic Trading Improve Liquidity?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(1), pages 1-33, February.
    9. Jonathan Brogaard & Terrence Hendershott & Ryan Riordan, 2014. "High-Frequency Trading and Price Discovery," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(8), pages 2267-2306.
    10. Foucault, Thierry & Pagano, Marco & Roell, Ailsa, 2013. "Market Liquidity: Theory, Evidence, and Policy," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199936243.
    11. Ho, Thomas S Y & Stoll, Hans R, 1983. " The Dynamics of Dealer Markets under Competition," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 38(4), pages 1053-1074, September.
    12. Jonathan Brogaard & Björn Hagströmer & Lars Nordén & Ryan Riordan, 2015. "Trading Fast and Slow: Colocation and Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 28(12), pages 3407-3443.
    13. Glosten, Lawrence R, 1994. " Is the Electronic Open Limit Order Book Inevitable?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(4), pages 1127-1161, September.
    14. Eric Budish & Peter Cramton & John Shim, 2015. "Editor's Choice The High-Frequency Trading Arms Race: Frequent Batch Auctions as a Market Design Response," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 130(4), pages 1547-1621.
    15. Garbade, Kenneth D & Silber, William L, 1978. "Technology, Communication and the Performance of Financial Markets: 1840-1975," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 33(3), pages 819-832, June.
    16. Pankaj K. Jain, 2005. "Financial Market Design and the Equity Premium: Electronic versus Floor Trading," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(6), pages 2955-2985, December.
    17. Vincent van Kervel, 2015. "Competition for Order Flow with Fast and Slow Traders," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 28(7), pages 2094-2127.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:32372. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/tsetofr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.