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Minimum price variations, time priority and quotes dynamics

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  • Tito Cordella
  • Thierry Foucault

Abstract

We analyze the impact of a minimum price variation (tick) and time priority on the dynamics of quotes and the trading costs when competition for the order flow is dynamic. We find that convergence to competitive outcomes can take time and that the speed of convergence is influenced by the tick size, the priority rule and the characteristics of the order arrival process. We show also that a zero minimum price variation is never optimal when competition for the order flow is dynamic. We compare the trading outcomes with and without time priority. Time priority is shown to guarantee that uncompetitive spreads cannot be sustained over time. However it can sometimes result in higher trading costs. Empirical implications are proposed. In particular, we relate the size of the trading costs to the frequency of new offers and the dynamics of the inside spread to the state of the book.

Suggested Citation

  • Tito Cordella & Thierry Foucault, 1996. "Minimum price variations, time priority and quotes dynamics," Economics Working Papers 182, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  • Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:182
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Goldstein, Michael A. & A. Kavajecz, Kenneth, 2000. "Eighths, sixteenths, and market depth: changes in tick size and liquidity provision on the NYSE," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 125-149, April.
    2. Kadan, Ohad, 2006. "So who gains from a small tick size?," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 32-66, January.
    3. van Achter, Mark, 2008. "Dynamic limit order market with diversity in trading horizons," CFS Working Paper Series 2008/46, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    4. Buti, Sabrina & Rindi, Barbara & Wen, Yuanji & Werner, Ingrid M., 2013. "Tick Size Regulation and Sub-Penny Trading," Working Paper Series 2013-14, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
    5. Pantisa Pavabutr & Sukanya Prangwattananon, 2009. "Tick size change on the Stock Exchange of Thailand," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 351-371, May.
    6. Large, Jeremy, 2009. "A market-clearing role for inefficiency on a limit order book," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 102-117, January.
    7. repec:eee:jbfina:v:85:y:2017:i:c:p:69-82 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Linton, O. & Mahmoodzadeh, S., 2018. "Implications of High-Frequency Trading for Security Markets," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1802, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    9. Ascioglu, Asli & Comerton-Forde, Carole & McInish, Thomas H., 2010. "An examination of minimum tick sizes on the Tokyo Stock Exchange," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 40-48, January.
    10. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1999. "Security bid/ask dynamics with discreteness and clustering: Simple strategies for modeling and estimation1," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 1-28, February.
    11. Biais, Bruno & Glosten, Larry & Spatt, Chester, 2005. "Market microstructure: A survey of microfoundations, empirical results, and policy implications," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 217-264, May.
    12. Jeremy Large, 2006. "A Market-Clearing Role for Inefficiency on a Limit Order Book," Economics Series Working Papers 2006-W08, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    13. Hans Degryse & Frank De Jong & Maarten Van Ravenswaaij & Gunther Wuyts, 2005. "Aggressive Orders and the Resiliency of a Limit Order Market," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 9(2), pages 201-242.
    14. Foucault, Thierry & Moinas, Sophie, 2018. "Is Trading Fast Dangerous?," TSE Working Papers 18-881, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    15. Ladley, Dan & Schenk-Hoppé, Klaus Reiner, 2009. "Do stylised facts of order book markets need strategic behaviour?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 817-831, April.
    16. Calcagno, R. & Lovo, S.M., 2002. "Market Efficiency and Price Formation When Dealers are Asymmetrically Informed," Discussion Paper 2002-42, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    17. Faith Chin & Corey Garriott, 2016. "Options Decimalization," Staff Working Papers 16-57, Bank of Canada.
    18. LOVO, Stefano M. & CALCAGNO, R., 2001. "Market efficiency and Price Formation when Dealers are Asymmetrically Informed," Les Cahiers de Recherche 737, HEC Paris.
    19. Joel Hasbrouck, 1998. "Security Bid/Ask Dynamics with Discreteness and Clustering: Simple Strategies for Modeling and Estimation," New York University, Leonard N. Stern School Finance Department Working Paper Seires 98-042, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business-.
    20. Murphy Jun Jie Lee, 2013. "The Microstructure of Trading Processes on the Singapore Exchange," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 4, january-d.
    21. Istvan Barra & Siem Jan Koopman & Agnieszka Borowska, 2016. "Bayesian Dynamic Modeling of High-Frequency Integer Price Changes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 16-028/III, Tinbergen Institute, revised 16 Feb 2018.
    22. Bourghelle, David & Declerck, Fany, 2004. "Why markets should not necessarily reduce the tick size," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 373-398, February.
    23. Liu, Wai-Man, 2009. "Monitoring and limit order submission risks," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 107-141, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Market--microstructure; tick size; time priority; quotes formation; trading costs;

    JEL classification:

    • G19 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Other
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection

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