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Financial transaction taxes, market composition, and liquidity

Author

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  • Hoffmann, Peter
  • Colliard, Jean-Edouard

Abstract

We use the introduction of a financial transaction tax (FTT) in France in 2012 to test competing theories on its impact. We find no support for the idea that an FTT improves market quality by affecting the composition of trading volume. Instead, our results are in line with the hypothesis that a lower trading volume reduces liquidity, and thereby market quality. Consistent with theories of asset pricing under transaction costs, we document a shift in security holdings from short-term to long-term investors. Finally, our findings show that moderate aggregate effects on market quality can mask large adjustments made by individual agents. JEL Classification: G10, G14, G18, H32

Suggested Citation

  • Hoffmann, Peter & Colliard, Jean-Edouard, 2017. "Financial transaction taxes, market composition, and liquidity," Working Paper Series 2030, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20172030
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Terrence Hendershott & Charles M. Jones & Albert J. Menkveld, 2011. "Does Algorithmic Trading Improve Liquidity?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(1), pages 1-33, February.
    2. Umlauf, Steven R., 1993. "Transaction taxes and the behavior of the Swedish stock market," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 227-240, April.
    3. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    4. Hong, Harrison & Yu, Jialin, 2009. "Gone fishin': Seasonality in trading activity and asset prices," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 672-702, November.
    5. Stiglitz, J.E., 1989. "Using Tax Policy To Curb Speculative Short-Term Trading," Papers t2, Columbia - Center for Futures Markets.
    6. David H. Autor, 2003. "Outsourcing at Will: The Contribution of Unjust Dismissal Doctrine to the Growth of Employment Outsourcing," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-42, January.
    7. Christophe Hurlin & Gregoire Iseli & Christophe Pérignon & Stanley Yeung, 2014. "The Counterparty Risk Exposure of ETF Investors," Working Papers halshs-01023807, HAL.
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    Cited by:

    1. Taneli Mäkinen & Francesco Palazzo, 2017. "The double bind of asymmetric information in over-the-counter markets," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1128, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Adam, Klaus & Beutel, Johannes & Marcet, Albert & Merkel, Sebastian, 2015. "Can a financial transaction tax prevent stock price booms?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(S), pages 90-109.
    3. Eichfelder, Sebastian & Lau, Mona, 2016. "Financial transaction taxes: Announcement effects, short-run effects, and long-run effects," arqus Discussion Papers in Quantitative Tax Research 211, arqus - Arbeitskreis Quantitative Steuerlehre.
    4. Eichfelder, Sebastian & Lau, Mona & Noth, Felix, 2017. "Financial transaction taxes: Announcement effects, short-run effects, and long-run effects," IWH Discussion Papers 4/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial transaction tax; high-frequency trading; institutional trading; liquidity;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • H32 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Firm

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