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Energy consumption restricted productivity re-estimates and industrial sustainability analysis in post-reform China


  • Chen, Shiyi
  • Santos-Paulino, Amelia U.


This paper investigates the impact of energy on China's industrial sustainability by using a novel approach to estimate real total factor productivity. The growth accounting indicates that the substantial industrial reforms in China have led to productivity growth. Energy and capital are also important factors driving China's industrial growth. Productivity growth in China's industry is mostly attributable to the high-tech light industrial sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Shiyi & Santos-Paulino, Amelia U., 2013. "Energy consumption restricted productivity re-estimates and industrial sustainability analysis in post-reform China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 52-60.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:57:y:2013:i:c:p:52-60 DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2012.08.060

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. CHEN Shiyi, 2009. "Engine or drag: Can high energy consumption and CO2 emission drive the sustainable development of Chinese industry?," Frontiers of Economics in China, Higher Education Press, vol. 4(4), pages 548-571, December.
    2. Nelson, Richard R & Pack, Howard, 1999. "The Asian Miracle and Modern Growth Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 416-436, July.
    3. Shen, Lei & Gao, Tian-ming & Cheng, Xin, 2012. "China's coal policy since 1979: A brief overview," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 274-281.
    4. Ricardo Hausmann & Jason Hwang & Dani Rodrik, 2007. "What you export matters," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, March.
    5. Chen, Shiyi & Jefferson, Gary H. & Zhang, Jun, 2011. "Structural change, productivity growth and industrial transformation in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 133-150, March.
    6. Zou, Gao Lu, 2012. "The long-term relationships among China's energy consumption sources and adjustments to its renewable energy policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 456-467.
    7. Gregory C. Chow, 1993. "Capital Formation and Economic Growth in China," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 809-842.
    8. Alwyn Young, 1995. "The Tyranny of Numbers: Confronting the Statistical Realities of the East Asian Growth Experience," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 641-680.
    9. Fisher-Vanden, Karen & Jefferson, Gary H., 2008. "Technology diversity and development: Evidence from China's industrial enterprises," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 658-672, December.
    10. Barry Bosworth & Susan M. Collins, 2008. "Accounting for Growth: Comparing China and India," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 45-66, Winter.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:enepol:v:109:y:2017:i:c:p:181-190 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. You, Jing & Huang, Yongfu, 2013. "Green-to-Grey China: Determinants and Forecasts of its Green Growth," MPRA Paper 57468, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 16 Jul 2014.
    3. Zhang, Ning & Kong, Fanbin & Choi, Yongrok, 2014. "Measuring sustainability performance for China: A sequential generalized directional distance function approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 392-397.
    4. Chen, Shiyi, 2015. "Environmental pollution emissions, regional productivity growth and ecological economic development in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 171-182.
    5. Zhao, Xingrong & Zhang, Xi & Shao, Shuai, 2016. "Decoupling CO2 emissions and industrial growth in China over 1993–2013: The role of investment," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 275-292.
    6. Yang, Zhenbing & Shao, Shuai & Yang, Lili & Liu, Jianghua, 2017. "Differentiated effects of diversified technological sources on energy-saving technological progress: Empirical evidence from China's industrial sectors," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 1379-1388.
    7. Xu, Bin & Lin, Boqiang, 2015. "How industrialization and urbanization process impacts on CO2 emissions in China: Evidence from nonparametric additive regression models," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 188-202.


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