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The impact of IT investment on energy: Japan and US comparison in 2010

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  • Takase, Kae
  • Murota, Yasuhiro

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  • Takase, Kae & Murota, Yasuhiro, 2004. "The impact of IT investment on energy: Japan and US comparison in 2010," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 1291-1301, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:32:y:2004:i:11:p:1291-1301
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 49-74, Fall.
    2. David, P.A., 2000. "Understanding Digital Technology's Evolution and the Path of Measured Productivity Growth: Present and Future in the Mirror of the Past," Papers 99-011, United Nations World Employment Programme-.
    3. Ruth A. Judson & Richard Schmalensee & Thomas M. Stoker, 1999. "Economic Development and the Structure of the Demand for Commercial Energy," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 29-57.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zheming Yan & Rui Shi & Zhiming Yang, 2018. "ICT Development and Sustainable Energy Consumption: A Perspective of Energy Productivity," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(7), pages 1-15, July.
    2. Sadorsky, Perry, 2012. "Information communication technology and electricity consumption in emerging economies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 130-136.
    3. Kouton, Jeffrey, 2019. "Information Communication Technology development and energy demand in African countries," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 189(C).
    4. Kais Saidi & Hassen Toumi & Saida Zaidi, 2017. "Impact of Information Communication Technology and Economic Growth on the Electricity Consumption: Empirical Evidence from 67 Countries," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(3), pages 789-803, September.
    5. Cho, Youngsang & Lee, Jongsu & Kim, Tai-Yoo, 2007. "The impact of ICT investment and energy price on industrial electricity demand: Dynamic growth model approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 4730-4738, September.
    6. Muhammad Shahbaz & Ijaz Ur Rehman & Rashid Sbia & Helmi Hamdi, 2016. "The Role of Information Communication Technology and Economic Growth in Recent Electricity Demand: Fresh Evidence from Combine Cointegration Approach in UAE," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 7(3), pages 797-818, September.
    7. Zhou, Xiaoyong & Zhou, Dequn & Wang, Qunwei, 2018. "How does information and communication technology affect China's energy intensity? A three-tier structural decomposition analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 748-759.
    8. Dehghan Shabani, Zahra & Shahnazi, Rouhollah, 2019. "Energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions, information and communications technology, and gross domestic product in Iranian economic sectors: A panel causality analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 1064-1078.

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