IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/eneeco/v59y2016icp149-158.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Modelling residential electricity demand in the GCC countries

Author

Listed:
  • Atalla, Tarek N.
  • Hunt, Lester C.

Abstract

This paper aims at understanding the drivers of residential electricity demand in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries by applying the structural time series model. In addition to the economic variables of GDP and real electricity prices, the model accounts for population, weather, and a stochastic underlying energy demand trend as a proxy for efficiency and human behaviour. The resulting income and price elasticities are informative for policy makers given the paucity of previous estimates for a region with particular political structures and economies subject to large shocks. In particular, the estimates allow for a sound assessment of the impact of energy-related policies suggesting that if policy makers in the region wish to curtail future residential electricity consumption they would need to improve the efficiency of appliances and increase energy using awareness of consumers, possibly by education and marketing campaigns. Moreover, even if prices were raised the impact on curbing residential electricity growth in the region is likely to be very small given the low estimated price elasticities—unless, that is, prices were raised so high that expenditure on electricity becomes such a large proportion of income that the price elasticities increase (in absolute terms).

Suggested Citation

  • Atalla, Tarek N. & Hunt, Lester C., 2016. "Modelling residential electricity demand in the GCC countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 149-158.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:59:y:2016:i:c:p:149-158
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2016.07.027
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140988316301992
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.eneco.2016.07.027?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hunt, Lester C. & Judge, Guy & Ninomiya, Yasushi, 2003. "Underlying trends and seasonality in UK energy demand: a sectoral analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 93-118, January.
    2. Javid, Muhammad & Qayyum, Abdul, 2014. "Electricity consumption-GDP nexus in Pakistan: A structural time series analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 811-817.
    3. Abdel-Aal, R.E. & Al-Garni, A.Z. & Al-Nassar, Y.N., 1997. "Modelling and forecasting monthly electric energy consumption in eastern Saudi Arabia using abductive networks," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 911-921.
    4. Adeyemi, Olutomi I. & Hunt, Lester C., 2014. "Accounting for asymmetric price responses and underlying energy demand trends in OECD industrial energy demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 435-444.
    5. Adeyemi, Olutomi I. & Broadstock, David C. & Chitnis, Mona & Hunt, Lester C. & Judge, Guy, 2010. "Asymmetric price responses and the underlying energy demand trend: Are they substitutes or complements? Evidence from modelling OECD aggregate energy demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1157-1164, September.
    6. Dilaver, Zafer & Hunt, Lester C, 2011. "Modelling and forecasting Turkish residential electricity demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3117-3127, June.
    7. Lester C. Hunt & Guy Judge & Yasushi Ninomiya, 2003. "Modelling underlying energy demand trends," Chapters, in: Lester C. Hunt (ed.), Energy in a Competitive Market, chapter 9, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Donald H. Rosenthal & Howard K. Gruenspecht & Emily A. Moran, 1995. "Effects of Global Warming on Energy Use for Space Heating and Cooling in the United States," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 77-96.
    9. Dilaver, Zafer & Hunt, Lester C., 2011. "Turkish aggregate electricity demand: An outlook to 2020," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 6686-6696.
    10. Özge Dilaver & Zafer Dilaver & Lester C Hunt, 2013. "What Drives Natural Gas Consumption in Europe? Analysis and Projections," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 143, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    11. Broadstock, David C. & Hunt, Lester C., 2010. "Quantifying the impact of exogenous non-economic factors on UK transport oil demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 1559-1565, March.
    12. Dilaver, Zafer & Hunt, Lester C., 2011. "Industrial electricity demand for Turkey: A structural time series analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 426-436, May.
    13. Ishmael Ackah, 2014. "Determinants of natural gas demand in Ghana," OPEC Energy Review, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, vol. 38(3), pages 272-295, September.
    14. Harvey, Andrew & Scott, Andrew, 1994. "Seasonality in Dynamic Regression Models," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(427), pages 1324-1345, November.
    15. Davis, W. Bart & Sanstad, Alan H. & Koomey, Jonathan G., 2003. "Contributions of weather and fuel mix to recent declines in US energy and carbon intensity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 375-396, July.
    16. Hunt, Lester C. & Ryan, David L., 2015. "Economic modelling of energy services: Rectifying misspecified energy demand functions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 273-285.
    17. Lester C. Hunt & Yasushi Ninomiya, 2003. "Unravelling Trends and Seasonality: A Structural Time Series Analysis of Transport Oil Demand in the UK and Japan," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 63-96.
    18. John Dimitropoulos & Lester Hunt & Guy Judge, 2005. "Estimating underlying energy demand trends using UK annual data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 239-244.
    19. Enrica De Cian & Elisa Lanzi & Roberto Roson, 2013. "Seasonal temperature variations and energy demand," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 116(3), pages 805-825, February.
    20. Reiche, Danyel, 2010. "Energy Policies of Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries--possibilities and limitations of ecological modernization in rentier states," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 2395-2403, May.
    21. M. Nagy Eltony & Mohammad A. Al‐Awadhi, 2007. "Residential energy demand: a case study of Kuwait," OPEC Energy Review, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, vol. 31(3), pages 159-168, September.
    22. Bigano, Andrea & Bosello, Francesco & Marano, Giuseppe, 2006. "Energy Demand and Temperature: A Dynamic Panel Analysis," International Energy Markets Working Papers 12117, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    23. Harvey, A C, et al, 1986. "Stochastic Trends in Dynamic Regression Models: An Application to the Employment-Output Equations," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 96(384), pages 975-985, December.
    24. Harvey, Andrew C & Koopman, Siem Jan, 1992. "Diagnostic Checking of Unobserved-Components Time Series Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(4), pages 377-389, October.
    25. Abdel-Aal, R.E. & Al-Garni, A.Z., 1997. "Forecasting monthly electric energy consumption in eastern Saudi Arabia using univariate time-series analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 22(11), pages 1059-1069.
    26. World Bank, 2014. "World Development Indicators 2014," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 18237.
    27. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell, 2009. "Multivariate granger causality between electricity consumption, exports and GDP: Evidence from a panel of Middle Eastern countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 229-236, January.
    28. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell & Prasad, Arti, 2007. "Electricity consumption in G7 countries: A panel cointegration analysis of residential demand elasticities," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 4485-4494, September.
    29. Harvey, Andrew, 1997. "Trends, Cycles and Autoregressions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 192-201, January.
    30. Muhammad, Javid & Abdul, Qayyum, 2013. "Electricity consumption-GDP nexus: A structural time series analysis," MPRA Paper 47448, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    31. Olonscheck, Mady & Holsten, Anne & Kropp, Jürgen P., 2011. "Heating and cooling energy demand and related emissions of the German residential building stock under climate change," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 4795-4806, September.
    32. Squalli, Jay, 2007. "Electricity consumption and economic growth: Bounds and causality analyses of OPEC members," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1192-1205, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Tehreem Fatima & Enjun Xia & Muhammad Ahad, 2019. "Oil demand forecasting for China: a fresh evidence from structural time series analysis," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 1205-1224, June.
    2. Atalla, Tarek N. & Gasim, Anwar A. & Hunt, Lester C., 2018. "Gasoline demand, pricing policy, and social welfare in Saudi Arabia: A quantitative analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 123-133.
    3. Alkhathlan, Khalid & Javid, Muhammad, 2015. "Carbon emissions and oil consumption in Saudi Arabia," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 105-111.
    4. Rodrigues, Niágara & Losekann, Luciano & Silveira Filho, Getulio, 2018. "Demand of automotive fuels in Brazil: Underlying energy demand trend and asymmetric price response," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 644-655.
    5. Javid, Muhammad & Qayyum, Abdul, 2014. "Electricity consumption-GDP nexus in Pakistan: A structural time series analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 811-817.
    6. Dilaver, Zafer & Hunt, Lester C., 2011. "Industrial electricity demand for Turkey: A structural time series analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 426-436, May.
    7. Dilaver, Zafer & Hunt, Lester C, 2011. "Modelling and forecasting Turkish residential electricity demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3117-3127, June.
    8. Dilaver, Zafer & Hunt, Lester C., 2011. "Turkish aggregate electricity demand: An outlook to 2020," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 6686-6696.
    9. Tajudeen, Ibrahim A., 2015. "Examining the role of energy efficiency and non-economic factors in energy demand and CO2 emissions in Nigeria: Policy implications," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 338-350.
    10. Adeyemi, Olutomi I. & Hunt, Lester C., 2014. "Accounting for asymmetric price responses and underlying energy demand trends in OECD industrial energy demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 435-444.
    11. Olaniyan, Monisola J. & Evans, Joanne, 2014. "The importance of engaging residential energy customers' hearts and minds," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 273-284.
    12. Alptekin, Aynur & Broadstock, David C. & Chen, Xiaoqi & Wang, Dong, 2019. "Time-varying parameter energy demand functions: Benchmarking state-space methods against rolling-regressions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 26-41.
    13. Ackah, Ishmael, 2015. "On the relationship between energy consumption, productivity and economic growth: Evidence from Algeria, Ghana, Nigeria and South Africa," MPRA Paper 64887, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Ackah, Ishmael & Appiah-Adu, Kwaku & Ahunu, Linda, 2015. "What Factors Drive Energy Consumption in Ghana?," MPRA Paper 66095, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Broadstock, David C. & Hunt, Lester C., 2010. "Quantifying the impact of exogenous non-economic factors on UK transport oil demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 1559-1565, March.
    16. Muhammad, Javid & Abdul, Qayyum, 2013. "Electricity consumption-GDP nexus: A structural time series analysis," MPRA Paper 47448, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Dilaver, Zafer & Hunt, Lester C., 2021. "Modelling U.S. gasoline demand: A structural time series analysis with asymmetric price responses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 156(C).
    18. Ishmael Ackah, 2014. "Determinants of natural gas demand in Ghana," OPEC Energy Review, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, vol. 38(3), pages 272-295, September.
    19. John Dimitropoulos & Lester Hunt & Guy Judge, 2005. "Estimating underlying energy demand trends using UK annual data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 239-244.
    20. Ringlund, Guro Bornes & Rosendahl, Knut Einar & Skjerpen, Terje, 2008. "Does oilrig activity react to oil price changes An empirical investigation," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 371-396, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    GCC residential electricity demand; Structural time series model; Impact of weather and exogenous underlying energy demand trend (UEDT);
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:59:y:2016:i:c:p:149-158. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.