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Driving for fun? Comparing the effect of fuel prices on weekday and weekend fuel consumption

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  • Frondel, Manuel
  • Vance, Colin

Abstract

Focusing on individual motorists in car-owning households in Germany, this paper investigates the determinants of automobile travel, with the specific aim of quantifying the effects of fuel prices and person-level attributes on travel conducted over a five-day week and weekend. Our analysis is predicated on the notion that car use is an individual decision, albeit one that is dependent on intra-household allocation processes, thereby building on a growing body of literature that has identified the importance of socioeconomic factors such as employment status, gender, and the presence of children in determining both access to and use of the car. To capture this two-stage decision process, we employ the two-part model, which consists of probit and OLS estimators, and derive elasticity estimates that incorporate both the discrete and continuous choices pertaining to car use. With fuel price elasticity estimates ranging between -Â 0.45 and -Â 0.50, our results suggest raising prices via fuel taxes to be a promising energy conservation and climate protection measure.

Suggested Citation

  • Frondel, Manuel & Vance, Colin, 2010. "Driving for fun? Comparing the effect of fuel prices on weekday and weekend fuel consumption," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 102-109, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:102-109
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jonathan E. Hughes & Christopher R. Knittel & Daniel Sperling, 2008. "Evidence of a Shift in the Short-Run Price Elasticity of Gasoline Demand," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 113-134.
    2. Daniel J. Graham & Stephen Glaister, 2002. "The Demand for Automobile Fuel: A Survey of Elasticities," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 36(1), pages 1-25, January.
    3. Manuel Frondel & Jorg Peters & Colin Vance, 2008. "Identifying the Rebound: Evidence from a German Household Panel," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 145-164.
    4. Ai, Chunrong & Norton, Edward C., 2003. "Interaction terms in logit and probit models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 123-129, July.
    5. Hay, Joel W & Olsen, Randall J, 1984. "Let Them Eat Cake: A Note on Comparing Alternative Models of the Demand for Medical Care," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 2(3), pages 279-282, July.
    6. Leung, Siu Fai & Yu, Shihti, 1996. "On the choice between sample selection and two-part models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1-2), pages 197-229.
    7. Edward C. Norton & Hua Wang & Chunrong Ai, 2004. "Computing interaction effects and standard errors in logit and probit models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(2), pages 154-167, June.
    8. Duan, Naihua, et al, 1984. "Choosing between the Sample-Selection Model and the Multi-part Model," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 2(3), pages 283-289, July.
    9. Kayser, Hilke A., 2000. "Gasoline demand and car choice: estimating gasoline demand using household information," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 331-348, June.
    10. Colin Vance & Ralf Hedel, 2007. "The impact of urban form on automobile travel: disentangling causation from correlation," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(5), pages 575-588, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Frondel Manuel & Vance Colin, 2013. "On Interaction Effects: The Case of Heckit and Two-Part Models," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 233(1), pages 22-38, February.
    2. Frondel, Manuel & Ritter, Nolan & Vance, Colin, 2012. "Heterogeneity in the rebound effect: Further evidence for Germany," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 461-467.
    3. Manuel Frondel & Colin Vance, 2010. "A Count Data Analysis of Ridership in Germany’s Public Transport," Ruhr Economic Papers 0209, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    4. Vivien Procher & Colin Vance, 2012. "Heterogeneity in the Correlates of Motorized and Non-Motorized Travel in Germany – The Intervening Role of Gender," Ruhr Economic Papers 0314, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    5. Vance, Colin & Peistrup, Matthias, 2012. "She's Got a Ticket to Ride: Gender and Public Transit Passes," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 1105-1119.
    6. Colin Vance & Matthias Peistrup, 2012. "She’s got a ticket to ride: gender and public transit passes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(6), pages 1105-1119, November.
    7. Tovar, Miguel A., 2011. "An integral evaluation of dieselisation policies for households' cars," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 5228-5242, September.
    8. repec:zbw:rwirep:0209 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:eee:transa:v:103:y:2017:i:c:p:154-171 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Yang, Dujuan & Timmermans, Harry, 2013. "Analysis of influence of fuel price on individual activity-travel time expenditure," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 40-55.
    11. Procher, Vivien & Vance, Colin, 2012. "Heterogeneity in the Correlates of Motorized and Non-motorized Travel in Germany: The Intervening Role of Gender," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 72-79.
    12. Galvin, Ray, 2016. "Rebound effects from speed and acceleration in electric and internal combustion engine cars: An empirical and conceptual investigation," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 207-216.
    13. repec:zbw:rwirep:0227 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Montag, Josef, 2015. "The simple economics of motor vehicle pollution: A case for fuel tax," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 138-149.
    15. Frondel, Manuel & Vance, Colin, 2010. "A Count Data Analysis of Ridership in Germany's Public Transport," Ruhr Economic Papers 209, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    16. Manuel Frondel & Nolan Ritter & Colin Vance, 2010. "Heterogeneity in the Rebound Eff ect – Further Evidence for Germany," Ruhr Economic Papers 0227, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    17. repec:zbw:rwirep:0314 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Pfeiffer, Birte & Mulder, Peter, 2013. "Explaining the diffusion of renewable energy technology in developing countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 285-296.
    19. Costolanski, Peter & Elahi, Raihan & Iimi, Atsushi & Kitchlu, Rahul, 2013. "Impact evaluation of free-of-charge CFL bulb distribution in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6383, The World Bank.
    20. Frondel, Manuel & Vance, Colin, 2011. "Rarely enjoyed? A count data analysis of ridership in Germany's public transport," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 425-433, March.

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