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Future direct and indirect costs of obesity and the influence of gaining weight: Results from the MONICA/KORA cohort studies, 1995–2005

  • Wolfenstetter, S.B.
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    Over the last two decades, the prevalence of obesity has risen worldwide. As obesity is a confirmed risk factor for a number of diseases, its increasing prevalence nurtures the supposition that obesity may present a growing and significant economic burden to society.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X11000918
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

    Volume (Year): 10 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 127-138

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:10:y:2012:i:2:p:127-138
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

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    1. Willard G. Manning & Anirban Basu & John Mullahy, 2003. "Generalized Modeling Approaches to Risk Adjustment of Skewed Outcomes Data," Working Papers 0313, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
    2. Cawley, John & Meyerhoefer, Chad, 2012. "The medical care costs of obesity: An instrumental variables approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 219-230.
    3. Duan, Naihua, et al, 1983. "A Comparison of Alternative Models for the Demand for Medical Care," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 1(2), pages 115-26, April.
    4. Beate Sander & Rito Bergemann, 2003. "Economic burden of obesity and its complications in Germany," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 248-253, December.
    5. Ebere Akobundu & Jing Ju & Lisa Blatt & C. Daniel Mullins, 2006. "Cost-of-Illness Studies: A Review of Current Methods," PharmacoEconomics, Springer Healthcare | Adis, vol. 24(9), pages 869-890.
    6. Jusot, Florence & Kunst, Anton E. & Leinsalu, Mall & Menvielle, Gwenn & Schaap, Maartje M. & Roskam, Albert-Jan R. & Stirbu, Irina & Mackenbach, Johan P., 2008. "Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health in 22 European Countries," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/10510, Paris Dauphine University.
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