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Spatial inequality and household poverty in Ghana

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  • Annim, Samuel Kobina
  • Mariwah, Simon
  • Sebu, Joshua

Abstract

The study analyses district-level consumption inequality in Ghana, explores the relative contribution of within- and between-district inequalities to national inequality and examines the relationship between household poverty and inequality. The last three rounds of the Ghana Living Standard Survey are used. We observe that the contribution of within-district inequality to national inequality is higher than inequality between districts. Also, district-level consumption inequality shows a significant effect on household poverty, but with varying signs. We surmise that the variation in signs is as a result of the state of economic activity and factors that affect both poverty and inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Annim, Samuel Kobina & Mariwah, Simon & Sebu, Joshua, 2012. "Spatial inequality and household poverty in Ghana," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 487-505.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecosys:v:36:y:2012:i:4:p:487-505 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecosys.2012.05.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephan Klasen & Nathalie Scholl & Rahul Lahoti & Sophie Ochmann & Sebastian Vollmer, 2016. "Inequality – Worldwide Trends and Current Debates," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 209, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    2. McKay Andrew & Pirttilä Jukka & Tarp Finn, 2015. "Ghana: Poverty Reduction Over Thirty Years," WIDER Working Paper Series 052, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. repec:rss:jnljse:v1i1p4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Eric Amoo Bondzie & Gabriel Obed Fosu & Ernest Obu-Cann, 2014. "Poverty and Regional Inequality in Ghana; A Review," Journal of Social Economics, Research Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 1(1), pages 32-36.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spatial inequality; Poverty; District; Household; Ghana;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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