IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

An anatomy of male labour market earnings inequality in Serbia, 1996-2003


  • Krstic, Gorana
  • Litchfield, Julie
  • Reilly, Barry


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Krstic, Gorana & Litchfield, Julie & Reilly, Barry, 2007. "An anatomy of male labour market earnings inequality in Serbia, 1996-2003," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 97-114, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecosys:v:31:y:2007:i:1:p:97-114

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Branko Milanovic, 1999. "Explaining the increase in inequality during transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(2), pages 299-341, July.
    2. Robert Eastwood, 2000. "Explaining the Increase in Inequality during the Transition: a Note," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 8(1), pages 251-252, March.
    3. Podder, Nripesh & Chatterjee, Srikanta, 2002. "Sharing the national cake in post reform New Zealand: income inequality trends in terms of income sources," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 1-27, October.
    4. Chiswick, Barry R & Mincer, Jacob, 1972. "Time-Series Changes in Personal Income Inequality in the United States from 1939, with Projections to 1985," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(3), pages 34-66, Part II, .
    5. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 1999. " When Economic Reform Is Faster Than Statistical Reform: Measuring and Explaining Income Inequality in Rural China," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(1), pages 33-56, February.
    6. Vodopivec, MIlan, 1993. "Determination of Earnings in Yugoslav Firms: Can It Be Squared with Labor Management?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(3), pages 623-632, April.
    7. Andrew Newell & Barry Reilly, 1999. "Rates of Return to Educational Qualifications in the Transitional Economies," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 67-84.
    8. Randall K. Filer & Jan Hanousek, 2002. "Data Watch: Research Data from Transition Economies," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 225-240, Winter.
    9. Cowell, Frank A., 1989. "Sampling variance and decomposable inequality measures," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 27-41, September.
    10. Fields, Gary S & Yoo, Gyeongjoon, 2000. "Falling Labor Income Inequality in Korea's Economic Growth: Patterns and Underlying Causes," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(2), pages 139-159, June.
    11. Wan, Guanghua, 2004. "Accounting for income inequality in rural China: a regression-based approach," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 348-363, June.
    12. Shorrocks, A F, 1982. "Inequality Decomposition by Factor Components," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 193-211, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Jelena Laušev, 2012. "Public Sector Pay Gap In Serbia During Large-Scale Privatisation,By Educational Qualification," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 57(192), pages 7-24, January –.
    2. Liviu Voinea, 2011. "A Contribution to the Public-Private Wage Inequality Debate: The Iconic Case of Romania," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 93, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    3. Gorana Krstić, 2016. "Why Income Inequality Is So High In Serbia: Empirical Evidence And A Measurement Of The Key Factors," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 61(210), pages 23-46, July - Se.
    4. Liviu Voinea & Flaviu Mihaescu, 2012. "A contribution to the public–private wage inequality debate," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(2), pages 315-337, April.
    5. Jelena Lausev, 2014. "WHAT HAS 20 YEARS OF PUBLIC–PRIVATE PAY GAP LITERATURE TOLD US? EASTERN EUROPEAN TRANSITIONING vs. DEVELOPED ECONOMIES," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 516-550, July.
    6. Kecmanovic, Milica, 2012. "Men's wage inequality in Serbia's transition," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 65-86.
    7. Holger Bonin & Ulf Rinne, 2014. "‘Beautiful Serbia’ - objective and subjective outcomes of active labour market policy in a transition economy," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 22(1), pages 43-67, January.
    8. Jens Holscher & Cristiano Perugini & Fabrizio Pompei, 2011. "Wage inequality, labour market flexibility and duality in Eastern and Western Europe," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 271-310.
    9. repec:sgh:gosnar:y:2017:i:1:p:5-31 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Arvind Ashta, 2017. "Work-sharing from Different Angles: A literature review," Working Papers CEB 17-033, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    11. Gabriela Grotkowska & Leszek Wincenciak & Tomasz Gajderowicz, 2017. "Evolution of the Public-Sector Wage Premium in Poland," Gospodarka Narodowa, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 1, pages 5-31.
    12. Anna LUKIYANOVA, 2008. "Structure and Distribution of Earnings in Russia, 1994–2003," The Journal of Comparative Economic Studies (JCES), The Japanese Society for Comparative Economic Studies (JSCES), vol. 4, pages 9-40, December.
    13. Gorana Krstić & Peter Sanfey, 2008. "Earnings Inequality and the Informal Economy: Evidence from Serbia," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 75, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecosys:v:31:y:2007:i:1:p:97-114. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.