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Have Europeans become more mobile? A note on regional evolutions in the EU: 1988-1997

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  • Tani, Massimiliano

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  • Tani, Massimiliano, 2003. "Have Europeans become more mobile? A note on regional evolutions in the EU: 1988-1997," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 23-30, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:80:y:2003:i:1:p:23-30
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McCormick, Barry, 1997. "Regional unemployment and labour mobility in the UK," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 581-589, April.
    2. Timothy J. Bartik, "undated". "Who Benefits from Local Job Growth: Migrants or Original Residents?," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles tjb1993rs, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    3. Mariassunta Giannetti, 2001. "Skill Complementarities and Migration Decisions," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 15(1), pages 1-31, March.
    4. Olympia Bover & Pilar Velilla, 1999. "Migrations in Spain: Historical Background and Current Trends," Working Papers 9909, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    5. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Lawrence F. Katz, 1992. "Regional Evolutions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(1), pages 1-76.
    6. Fredriksson, Peter, 1999. "The Dynamics of Regional Labor Markets and Active Labor Market Policy: Swedish Evidence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(4), pages 623-648, October.
    7. Paolo Mauro & Antonio Spilimbergo, 1999. "How Do the Skilled and the Unskilled Respond to Regional Shocks?: The Case of Spain," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 46(1), pages 1-1.
    8. Demertzis, Maria & Hughes Hallett, Andrew, 1995. "On Measuring the Costs of Labour Immobility and Market Heterogeneity in Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 1189, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. T Kontuly & K P Schön, 1994. "Changing Western German Internal Migration Systems during the Second Half of the 1980s," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 26(10), pages 1521-1543, October.
    10. Maurice Obstfeld & Giovanni Peri, 1998. "Regional non-adjustment and fiscal policy," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 13(26), pages 205-259, April.
    11. Pissarides, Christopher A & McMaster, Ian, 1990. "Regional Migration, Wages and Unemployment: Empirical Evidence and Implications for Policy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(4), pages 812-831, October.
    12. Jackman, Richard & Savouri, Savvas, 1992. "Regional Migration in Britain: An Analysis of Gross Flows Using NHS Central Register Data," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(415), pages 1433-1450, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman & M. Rose Olfert & Ying Tan, 2015. "When Spatial Equilibrium Fails: Is Place-Based Policy Second Best?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(8), pages 1303-1325, August.
    2. Greenaway-McGrevy, Ryan & Hood, Kyle K., 2016. "Worker migration or job creation? Persistent shocks and regional recoveries," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, pages 1-16.
    3. Tani, Massimiliano & Manuguerra, Maurizio, 2013. "The Effect of Migration and Spatial Connectivity on Regional Skill Endowments across Europe: 1988-2010," IZA Discussion Papers 7292, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Smets, Frank & Beyer, Robert C. M., 2015. "Labour market adjustments in Europe and the US: How different?," Working Paper Series 1767, European Central Bank.
    5. Kenmei Tsubota, 2009. "Agglomeration and wage bargaining," KIER Working Papers 675, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    6. Nadia Granato & Anette Haas & Silke Hamann & Annekatrin Niebuhr, 2015. "The Impact Of Skill-Specific Migration On Regional Unemployment Disparities In Germany," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 513-539, September.
    7. Juessen, Falko & Linnemann, Ludger, 2012. "Identifying Regional Labor Demand Shocks Using Sign Restrictions," IZA Discussion Papers 6767, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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